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SMITH COLLEGE COURSES OF STUDY
ACADEMIC YEAR 2012-2013

This site contains the Courses of Study offered by Smith College, Five-College Faculty Course Offerings, and Five-College Certificate Programs. The Smith College Courses of Study details course offerings, instructors, requirements for the majors and minors, and degree requirements.

The information contained in the Courses of Study documents is accurate as of August 2012. Smith College reserves the right to make changes to the Courses of Study, including changes in its course offerings, instructors, requirements for the majors and minors, and degree requirements. Course information contained herein is compiled by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty from data submitted by departments and programs. All data listed is as officially and formally approved by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty, the Committee on Academic Priorities, and the faculty-at-large. Additional information may be available on the individual Web sites of departments and programs.

Environmental Science and Policy




Environmental Science and Policy


__________________________


Director

L. David Smith, Professor of Biological Sciences


Mellon Post Doctoral Fellow and Lecturer

Julianne H. Busa


Visiting Assistant Professor
Ninian Stein


Members of the Advisory Committee

†1 Donald C. Baumer, Professor of Government

†2 Nathanael Fortune, Professor of Physics

Elliot Fratkin, Professor of Anthropology

**1 Virginia Hayssen, Professor of Biological Sciences

†1 Robert M. Newton, Professor of Geosciences

**1 Paulette Peckol, Professor of Biological Sciences

L. David Smith, Professor of Biological Sciences

Gregory White, Professor of Government

**1, *2 Elisabeth Armstrong, Associate Professor of the Study of Women and Gender

Andrew J. Guswa, Professor of Engineering

†2 Michelle Joffroy, Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese

*2 Leslie King, Associate Professor of Sociology

Jeffry Ramsey, Associate Professor of Philosophy

Amy Larson Rhodes, Associate Professor of Geosciences

*1Jesse Bellemare, Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences

†1 Shizuka Hsieh, Associate Professor of Chemistry

*1 Susan Stratton Sayre, Assistant Professor of Economics


_________________________


ENV 100 Environment and Sustainability: Notes from the Field 

This one-credit lecture series will introduce students to theory and practice in fields related to the environment and sustainability. Students will gain insight to how their liberal arts education and associated intellectual capacities are applied in a variety of contexts. Speakers, including distinguished alumnae, will be drawn from the Five Colleges, the Pioneer Valley, and beyond. This course can be repeated for credit. This course will end the week before Thanksgiving. Graded S/U only. (E) 1 credit

Ninian Stein

Offered Fall 2012


ENV 101 Environmental Integration I: Perspectives

This course examines how humans are changing Earth’s biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere, and the social, scientific, and political challenges posed by these environmental alterations. We will reflect on how differing worldviews have influenced our actions and may determine our future trajectory. Readings and discussions will examine scientific evidence, policies designed to improve the environment, and national and international responses to the environmental crises that confront humanity. Students will investigate strategies for mitigating damage, conserving resources, and restoring natural functions of the Earth. Enrollment limited to 60.  (E) {H/N/S} 4 credits.

Ninian Stein

Offered Fall 2012


ENV 150/GEO 150 Modeling our World: An Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

A geographic information system (GIS) manages location-based (spatial) information and provides the tools to display and analyze it. GIS provides the capabilities to link databases and maps and to overlay, query, and visualize those databases in order to analyze and solve problems in many diverse fields. This course provides an introduction to the fundamental elements of GIS and connects course activities to GIS applications in landscape architecture, urban and regional planning, archeology, flood management, sociology, coastal studies, environmental health, oceanography, economics, disaster management, cultural anthropology, and art history. Enrollment limited to 20. {N} 4 credits

Jack Loveless

Offered Fall 2012


ENV 201 Environmental Integration II: Collecting and Analyzing Information

While focusing on topical environmental issues, students will learn how to gather, analyze and present data using methods from the natural and social sciences. Data will be drawn from multiple sources, including laboratory experiments, fieldwork, databases, archival sources, surveys, and interviews. Emphasis will be on quantitative analysis. Environmental topics will vary in scale from the local to the global. ENV 202 must be taken concurrently. Prerequisite: one semester of statistics. ENV 101 is recommended. Enrollment limited to 18. (E) Q {N/S} 4 credits

Members of the Program

Offered both semesters each year


ENV 202 Environmental Integration II: Collecting and Analyzing Information Laboratory

In this laboratory complement to ENV 201, students will use a variety of methods to gather and analyze different types of environmental data (e.g., quantitative, qualitative, spatial). Enrollment limited to 18. (E) Q {N/S} 1 credit

Members of the Program

Offered both semesters each year


ENV 266/GER 266 Landscapes of Northern Germany: Natural Environments and Human Influences

The course will include lectures, field trips to locations in Northern Germany, and seminars with student presentations and discussion. The lectures cover a general introduction into different landscape types of Northern Germany, their geology, characteristic plant and animal life, and their development through time. The effects of humans on landscape development will be highlighted for the last 6.000 years. Possibilities and constraints of sustainable development based on the natural resources of the region will be discussed. Different landscapes of Northern Germany will be visited over five days of field trips, to get a good overview of the landscape types present. 

(E) {N/S} 4 credits

Kai Jensen (University of Hamburg, Biology Department)

Offered Spring 2013 in Hamburg, Germany


ENV 311 Environmental Integration III: Interpreting and Communicating Information

This course focuses on the interpretation and communication of environmental issues and solutions from multi- and interdisciplinary perspectives. Using contemporaneous environmental topics as a foundation, this course introduces students to written, oral, visual, and quantitative communication for a variety of audiences and intents. Students will develop the ability to interpret environmental information from multiple sources, to synthesize that information for their own understanding, and to communicate that knowledge in ways appropriate to the particular objective and audience. A final project enables students to communicate an environmental issue of their own choosing to a diversity of audiences. ENV 101 and ENV 201/202 are recommended. Enrollment limited to 25. (E) {N/S} 4 credits.

Susan Stratton Sayre

Offered Spring 2013


ENV 312 Environmental Integration: IV: Sustainable Solutions

This course engages the class in a semester-long design and/or analysis project. Students will work in ad hoc teams using a variety of skills and knowledge to address a current issue or question related to environmental sustainability. The specific projects will vary from year to year. Students will gain direct experience with the range and complexity of activities required to address a real-world environmental project. Student work will be assessed via progress reports (written and oral), reflective essays, and a final report. Prerequisites: ENV 101, Statistics, ENV 201/202, ENV 311. ENV 311 may be taken concurrently. Enrollment limited to 16. (E) {N/S} 4 credits.

Members of the Program

Offered both semesters each year


The Major


Advisers: Elisabeth Armstrong, Donald Baumer, Jesse Bellemare, Elliot Fratkin, Nathanael Fortune, Andrew J. Guswa, Virginia Hayssen, Shizuka Hsieh, Michelle Joffroy, Leslie King, Robert Newton, Paulette Peckol, Jeffry Ramsey, Amy Larson Rhodes, Susan Stratton Sayre, L. David Smith, Gregory White


The Environmental Science and Policy (ES&P) major is designed for students with interests in the environment and sustainability and a commitment to scientifically based problem solving and policy analysis. The objectives of the major are to prepare students to transcend disciplinary boundaries; combine analytical and communication skills with a well-rounded understanding of the environment; and translate this knowledge into meaningful action and innovative solutions. Four integration courses form the intellectual and organizational core of the major. Each course brings together frameworks, proficiencies, and knowledge from natural and social sciences in an explicitly integrative fashion to explore and analyze important environmental topics at local, regional, national and global levels. Additional introductory courses provide breadth in the natural and social sciences/humanities and statistics and introduce students to fundamental aspects of disciplines important to understanding human-environment interactions. Students gain depth of knowledge by choosing a coherent sequence of electives with a clear environmental focus. Students are strongly encouraged to engage in environmentally oriented internships, independent research, or study away opportunities.

Prospective majors should consult with an ES&P faculty adviser in choosing their courses. In their first semesters, students are encouraged to enroll in one of the introductory courses (see list) and an appropriate integration course (ENV 101) as well as statistics.


Requirements: The ES&P major requires 14 courses. These include:

1. four environmental integration courses (ENV 101, ENV 201/202, ENV 311, ENV 312); 

2. three introductory courses in the natural sciences from different areas (BIO, GEO, CHM, PHY/EGR), two of which must include labs (see list); 

3. two introductory courses in the category of social sciences, humanities and policy from different departments(see list);

4. one course in statistics; and

5. four electives that create a coherent sequence with a clear environmental focus. No more than 1 elective can be at the 100-level and at least one must be at the 300-level. ENV 100 may not be used as an elective. One semester of independent study (ENV 400) or credit toward an Honors thesis (ENV 430d) may be substituted for 1 elective. 


One course fulfilling the major requirements may be taken S/U; ENV 201/202, ENV 311, and ENV 312 may not be taken S/U.


Options for majors with Advanced Placement credit:

Majors with scores of 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement examination in environmental science may receive four credits toward the major in lieu of a 100-level elective (see list) with the approval of the major adviser.


Environmental Integration Courses


All majors must complete the four environmental integration courses:


ENV 101 Environmental Integration I: Perspectives

ENV 201 Environmental Integration II: Collecting and Analyzing Information with laboratory, ENV 202

ENV 311 Environmental Integration III: Interpreting and Communicating Information

ENV 312 Environmental Integration: IV: Sustainable Solutions


Introductory Courses


Natural Sciences

All majors must take one course in three of the following four natural science areas. Two of these courses must include a laboratory or field component (designated by L). Students with Advanced Placement credit (4 or 5) in an area may substitute an appropriate upper-level course in consultation with an ES&P adviser and in accordance with guidelines of the home department.


Biological Sciences

BIO 154 Biodiversity, Ecology and Conservation 

BIO 155 Biodiversity, Ecology and Conservation Lab (L)


Chemistry

CHM 108 Environmental Chemistry

CHM 111 Chemistry I: General Chemistry (L)

CHM 118 Advanced General Chemistry (L)


Geosciences

FYS 134 Geology in the Field (L)

GEO 101 Introduction to Earth Processes and History

GEO 102 Exploring the Local Geological Landscape (L only) †1

GEO 104 Global Climate Change

GEO 105 Natural Disasters

GEO 106 Extraordinary Events in the History of Earth, Life and Climate

GEO 108 Oceanography: An Introduction to the Marine Environment (L)

GEO 109 The Environment


Physics and Engineering

EGR 100 Engineering for Everyone*

PHY 100 Solar Energy and Sustainability (L)

PHY 201 Renewable and Non-Renewable Energy: Science

and Implications 


†1 GEO 102 counts only as a lab course. To fulfill the GEO requirement for the major, GEO 102 must accompany a GEO lecture course.


*EGR 100 has several rotating themes; approval is granted for years when the focus is on energy and sustainability


Social Sciences, Humanities and Policy

All majors must take two courses from the social science, humanities and policy category listed below. The courses must be from different departments. Students with Advanced Placement credit (4 or 5) in an area may substitute an appropriate upper-level course in consultation with an ES&P adviser and in accordance with guidelines from the home department. 


ANT 130 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

ANT 241 Anthropology of Development

ECO 150 Introductory Microeconomics

GOV 200 American Government

GOV 207 Politics of Public Policy

GOV 241 International Politics

PHI 238 Environmental Ethics

PPL 220 Public Policy Analysis

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology

SWG 150 Introduction to the Study of Women and Gender


Statistics


Majors must take one course in statistics (e.g., ECO 220, MTH 190/PSY 190, GOV 190, MTH 245 or SOC 201).



Electives


Majors should choose their elective courses in consultation with the major adviser to create a coherent sequence with a clear environmental focus; the focus may be specific to a discipline, topic, or location. No more than 1 elective can be at the 100-level; at least one must be at the 300-level.

ENV 100 may not be used as an elective. Electives can be identified at the time the major is declared, but not later than the end of the add/drop period of the first semester of junior year. Subsequent changes require approval of the major adviser. Electives can include, but are not limited to, the approved list below. Other relevant courses offered at Smith, within the Five College Consortium, or in study abroad programs may be used to satisfy the electives requirement of the major with consultation and approval of the major adviser.

One semester of independent study (ENV 400) or credit toward an Honors thesis (ENV 430d) may be substituted for one elective. Internships, study abroad, or Praxis experiences are encouraged.


Biological Sciences

BIO 103 Economic Botany: Plants and Human Affairs

BIO 260 Invertebrate Diversity

BIO 264 Plant Diversity and Evolution

BIO 266 Principles of Ecology 

BIO 268 Marine Ecology

BIO 272 Vertebrate Biology

BIO 364 Plant Ecology 

BIO 366 Biogeography

BIO 390 Topics in Environmental Biology: Coral Reefs: Past, Present and Future


Chemistry

CHM 346 Environmental Analytical Chemistry


Environmental Science and Policy

ENV 150/GEO 150 Modeling our World: An Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

ENV 266/GER 266 Landscapes of Northern Germany:

Natural Environments and Human Influences


Geosciences

GEO 231 Invertebrate Paleontology and Paleoecology

GEO 232 Sedimentology

GEO 251 Geomorphology

GEO 270j Carbonate Systems and Coral Reefs of the Bahamas

GEO 301 Aqueous Geochemistry

GEO 309 Groundwater Geology

GEO 311 Environmental Geophysics


Physics and Engineering

EGR 312 Thermochemical Processes in the Atmosphere

EGR 315 Ecohydrology

EGR 325 Electric Energy Systems

EGR 330 Engineering and Global Development

EGR 346 Hydrosystems Engineering

EGR 360 Chemical & Environmental Reaction Engineering

EGR 390 Seminar: Advanced Topics in Engineering: Technology Risk Assessment and Communication


Social Sciences, Humanities and Policy

ANT 230 Africa: Peoples, Environment, and Development Issues ANT 236 Economy, Ecology, and Society

ANT 241 Anthropology of Development

EAS 220 Environment and Society in Contemporary China

ECO 213 The World Food System

ECO 224 Environmental Economics

GES 302 Costa Rica at a Crossroads: Examination of Globalization and Sustainability

GOV 254 Politics of the Global Environment

GOV 306 Seminar in American Government- Topic: Politics and the Environment

HST 299 Ecology and History in Africa

PHI 238 Environmental Ethics

POR 221 Topics in Portuguese and Brazilian Literature

and Culture: Eco Brazil: Key Environmental Issues

PPL 220 Public Policy Analysis

SOC 232 World Population

SOC 233 Environment and Society

SOC 333 Seminar: Social Justice, the Environment and the Corporation

SPN 372 Topics in Latin American and Iberian Studies: Women, Environmental Justice and Social Action

SWG 230 Feminisms and the Fate of the Environment


ENV 400 Special Studies

Admission by permission of the instructor. Special Studies are open only to qualified juniors and seniors, and in appropriate cases, to sophomores. 1–4 credits

Offered both semesters each year


Honors

Students with a strong academic background who wish to conduct independent and original work on an environmental topic are encouraged to pursue an honors project.


Director: Virginia Hayssen


Please consult the director of honors for specific requirements and application procedures.


430d Honors Project

8 credits

Full-year course: Offered every year


Study Abroad


Students may elect to take courses for the major outside Smith College by participating in an environmentally oriented, off-campus program. Relevant Smith approved programs include, but are not limited to, Duke University's Organization for Tropical Studies, The School for Field Studies, The School for International Training, SEA Semester and the Maritime Studies Program of Williams College and Mystic Seaport. Courses from other study away programs may also be eligible for credit with approval of the major adviser. Study away courses will generally count as 200-level electives but specific courses in specific programs could be authorized to count as 300-level electives with approval of the major adviser.


Study Abroad Adviser: Your major adviser for Environmental Science and Policy


The Minor


Advisers: Advisers for the major also serve as advisers for the minor


The minor consists of six courses chosen with the guidance and approval of an ES&P adviser. Interested students are urged to meet with the Director, Coordinator and/or an ES&P adviser early in their academic planning.


Requirements: Six courses including ENV 101, two courses from the natural science category (must not be in the same area), one course from the social science, humanities and policy category, plus two electives in consultation with the minor adviser. For three of the six courses, two must be 200-level or higher; normally the third should be above the 100-level.

ENV 100 may not be used as an elective. ENV 201/202 and ENV 311 may count as electives toward the minor, but do not fulfill either the natural science or the social science, humanities and policy requirements. A course in statistics (e.g. MTH 245 or the equivalent) and Geographic Information Systems (e.g. ENV/GEO 150) are recommended. Appropriate Smith courses not listed below, Five College courses, or courses taken at other institutions and through summer and/or semester-away programs may be counted toward the minor with pre-approval of the adviser. Students must satisfy the prerequisites for all courses included in their minor program. No more than three of the six courses may be taken at other institutions. No more than one course may be taken S/U; ENV 101 may not be taken S/U.


Natural Sciences

All minors must take one course in two of the following four natural science areas.


Biological Sciences

BIO 154 Biodiversity, Ecology and Conservation

BIO 266 Principles of Ecology

BIO 268 Marine Ecology and lab

BIO 364 Plant Ecology and lab

BIO 390 Topics in Environmental Biology: Coral Reefs: Past, Present and Future


Chemistry

CHM 108 Environmental Chemistry

CHM 346 Environmental Analytical Chemistry

EGR 260 Mass and Energy Balances

EGR 312 Thermochemical Processes in the Atmosphere

GEO 301 Aqueous Geochemistry*



Geosciences

EGR 315 Ecohydrology

GEO 101 Introduction to Earth Processes and History

GEO 104 Global Climate Change: Exploring the Past, the Present, and Options for the Future

GEO 105 Natural Disasters: Confronting and Coping

GEO 108 Oceanography: An Introduction to the Marine Environment

GEO 109 The Environment

GEO 301 Aqueous Geochemistry*

GEO 309 Groundwater Geology


Physics and Engineering

EGR 100 Engineering for Everyone*

EGR 260 Mass and Energy Balances

EGR 312 Thermochemical Processes in the Atmosphere

EGR 315 Ecohydrology

PHY 100 Solar Energy and Sustainability

PHY 201 Renewable and Non-Renewable Energy:

Science and Implications


EGR 260, 312, and 315 and GEO 301 may be used to fulfill a natural science requirement in either of two categories.


*EGR 100 has several rotating themes; approval is granted for years when the focus is on energy and sustainability.


Social Sciences, Humanities and Policy

ANT 230 Africa: Peoples, Environment, and Development Issues 

ANT 236 Economy, Ecology, and Society

ANT 241 Anthropology of Development

ECO 224 Environmental Economics

ENV 205 Environmental Policy: Economic Perspectives

GOV 254 Politics of the Global Environment

GOV 306 Politics and the Environment

SOC 233 Environment and Society

SOC 332 Seminar in Environmental Sociology



Electives

All minors must take two elective courses. Electives can include, but are not limited to, the approved list below. 


BIO 103 Economic Botany: Plants and Human Affairs

BIO 110 Introductory Colloquia: Bacteria: The Good, The Bad, and the Absolutely Necessary

BIO 260 Invertebrate Diversity

BIO 264 Plant Diversity and Evolution

BIO 272 Vertebrate Biology

BIO 366 Biogeography

EAS 220 Environment and Society in Contemporary China

ECO 213 The World Food System

EGR 325 Electric Energy Systems

EGR 330 Engineering and Global Development

EGR 346 Hydrosystems Engineering

EGR 390 Seminar: Advanced Topics in Engineering: Science, Technology and Ethics

ENV 150/GEO 150 Modeling our World: An Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

ENV 201/202 Environmental Integration II: Collecting

And Analyzing Information

ENV 266/GER 266 Landscapes of Northern Germany: Natural Environments and Human Influences

ENV 311 Environmental Integration III: Interpreting and Communicating Information

FYS 177 Global Environmental Changes and Challenges

GES 302 Costa Rica at a Crossroads: Examination of Globalization and Sustainability

GEO 270j Carbonate Systems and Coral Reefs of the Bahamas

GEO 231 Invertebrate Paleontology and Paleoecology

GEO 232 Sedimentology

GEO 251 Geomorphology

GOV 207 Politics of Public Policy

HST 299 Ecology and History in Africa

PHI 238 Environmental Ethics

PHI 304 Colloquium in Applied Ethics: Sustainability

POR 221 Topics in Portuguese and Brazilian Literature and Culture: Eco Brazil: Key Environmental Issues 

PPL 220 Public Policy Analysis

SOC 232 World Population

SPN 372 Topics in Latin American and Iberian Studies: Women, Environmental Justice and Social Action

SWG 230 Feminisms and the Fate of the Environment

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