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SMITH COLLEGE COURSES OF STUDY
ACADEMIC YEAR 2012-2013

This site contains the Courses of Study offered by Smith College, Five-College Faculty Course Offerings, and Five-College Certificate Programs. The Smith College Courses of Study details course offerings, instructors, requirements for the majors and minors, and degree requirements.

The information contained in the Courses of Study documents is accurate as of August 2012. Smith College reserves the right to make changes to the Courses of Study, including changes in its course offerings, instructors, requirements for the majors and minors, and degree requirements. Course information contained herein is compiled by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty from data submitted by departments and programs. All data listed is as officially and formally approved by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty, the Committee on Academic Priorities, and the faculty-at-large. Additional information may be available on the individual Web sites of departments and programs.

Government


Government


_________________________


Professors

Susan C. Bourque, Ph.D.

Steven Martin Goldstein, Ph.D.

Donna Robinson Divine, Ph.D.

Martha A. Ackelsberg, Ph.D. (Government and Study of Women and Gender)

†1 Donald C. Baumer, Ph.D.

Dennis Yasutomo, Ph.D.

Patrick Coby, Ph.D.

 **1, *2 Howard Gold, Ph.D.

Gregory White, Ph.D.

Mlada Bukovansky, Ph.D.

Alice L. Hearst, J.D., Ph.D., Chair

Marc Lendler, Ph.D.


Associate Professors

**2 Velma E. Garcia, Ph.D.

†2 Gary Lehring, Ph.D.


Assistant Professor

**1 Brent Durbin, Ph.D.


Adjunct Associate Professor

Lee Drutman, Ph.D.


Lecturers

Noel Twagiramungu, Ph.D.

Jeremy Wolf, B.A.

Cord Jakobeit, Ph.D.


Research Associate

Michael Clancy, Ph.D.


_________________________



Seminars require the permission of the instructor and ordinarily presume as a prerequisite a 200-level course in the same field.


100 Introduction to Political Thinking

A study of the leading ideas of the Western political tradition, focusing on such topics as justice, power, legitimacy, revolution, freedom, equality and forms of government—democracy especially. Lecture/discussion format taught in independent sections, with one or more sections designated Writing Intensive (WI). Open to all students. Entering students considering a major in Government are strongly encouraged to take the course in their first year, either in the fall or the spring semester. {S} 4 credits

Susan C. Bourque, Donna R. Divine, Steven Goldstein, Gary Lehring, Fall 2012

Martha Ackelsberg, Patrick Coby, Spring 2013

Offered both semesters each year


190 Empirical Methods in Political Science

The fundamental problems in summarizing, interpreting, and analyzing empirical data. Topics include research design and measurement, descriptive statistics, sampling, significance tests, correlation, and regression. Special attention will be paid to survey data and to data analysis using computer software. {S/M} 5 credits

Howard Gold

Offered Spring 2014


American Government


200 is suggested preparation for all other courses in this field.


200 American Government

A study of the politics and governance in the United States. Special emphasis is placed on how the major institutions of American government are influenced by public opinion and citizen behavior, and how all of these forces interact in the determination of government policy. {S} 4 credits

Jeremy Wolf, Spring 2013

Donald Baumer, Spring 2014

Offered Spring 2013, Spring 2014


201 American Constitutional Interpretation

The study of Supreme Court decisions, documents, and other writings dealing with Constitutional theory and interpretation. Special attention is given to understanding the institutional role of the Supreme Court. Not open to first-year students. {S} 4 credits

Alice Hearst

Offered Fall 2012, Fall 2013


202 American Constitutional Law: The Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment

Fundamental rights of persons and citizens as interpreted by decisions of the Supreme Court, with emphasis on the interpretation of the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment. {S} 4 credits

Alice Hearst

Offered Spring 2013, Spring 2014


204 Urban Politics

The growth and development of political communities in metropolitan areas in the United States, with specific reference to the experiences of women, black and white. Focus on the social structuring of space; the ways patterns of urban development reflect prevailing societal views on relations of race, sex, and class; intergovernmental relations; and the efforts of people——through governmental action or popular movements——to affect the nature and structure of the communities in which they live.  Not open to first-year students.  {S} 4 credits

Martha Ackelsberg

Offered Spring 2013


205 Colloquium: Strange Bedfellows: State Power and Regulation of the Family

Explores the status of the family in American political life, and its role as a mediating structure between the individual and the state. Emphasis will be placed on the role of the courts in articulating the rights of the family and its members. Limited enrollment. Suggested preparation GOV 202 or WST 225. {S} 4 credits

Alice Hearst

Offered Fall 2012, Spring 2014


206 The American Presidency

An analysis of the executive power in its constitutional setting and of the changing character of the executive branch. 

{S} 4 credits

Marc Lendler

Offered Spring 2013, Spring 2014


207 Politics of Public Policy

A thorough introduction to the study of public policy in the United States. A theoretical overview of the policy process provides the framework for an analysis of several substantive policy areas, to be announced at the beginning of the term. {S} 4 credits

Donald Baumer

Offered Fall 2013


208 Elections in the Political Order

An examination and analysis of electoral politics in the United States. Voting and elections are viewed in the context of democracy. Topics include electoral participation, presidential selection, campaigns, electoral behavior, public opinion, parties, and Congressional elections. Special attention will be paid to the 2012 presidential election. {S} 4 credits

Marc Lendler, Howard Gold

Offered Fall 2012


213 Colloquium: The Bush Years

This course will look at the eight years of the Bush presidency, including his election, domestic issues such as tax cuts, response to 9/11, the lead up to and conduct of the war in Iraq, the controversies around the “unitary presidency,” the response to Hurricane Katrina, and the financial destabilization of 2008. The purpose will be to bring perspective to those years. Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequisite is at least one other course in American Government. (E) {S} 4 credits

Marc Lendler

Offered Spring 2013, Spring 2014


215 Colloquium: The Clinton Years

This is a course about the eight years of the Clinton Presidency. It will cover the elections, policy debates, foreign policy, battles with the Republican Congress and impeachment. The purpose is to begin the task of bringing perspective to those years. Prerequisites: One American Government course and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20. 

{S} 4 credits

Marc Lendler

Offered Fall 2012, Fall 2013


217 Colloquium: The Politics of Wealth and Poverty in the U.S.

This course examines changing patterns of wealth and income inequality in the U.S. We will explore how these inequalities have developed over time and various responses to them, both at the level of public policy, and at the level of popular activism and/or social mobilizations. We’ll pay particular attention to the ways gender, race, sexuality, and ethnic differences interact in the structuring of social and political, as well as economic, inequalities. Enrollment is limited to 20 students. Prerequisite: Gov 100 or a course in U.S. politics. {S} 4 credits

Martha Ackelsberg

Offered Fall 2012


304 Seminar in American Government

Topic: Organized Labor and Liberal Democracy. Proponents of liberal democracy face a dilemma: on the one hand, liberal democracy must avoid the existence of factions large and powerful enough to tyrannize those outside the faction. On the other hand, it must allow individuals to form organizations in order to leverage greater amounts of political power, else the endless clash of differing opinions and interests would be likely to cause democracy to grind to a halt. This course examines this tension through the lens of the labor union, drawing on texts from labor histories, political theorists, legislators, and labor activists. Prerequisite: a 200 level course in American Government. {S} 4 credits

 Jeremy Wolf

Offered Fall 2012


306 Seminar in American Government

Topic: Politics and the Environment. An examination of environmental policy making within the federal government, with special emphasis on how Congress deals with environmental policy issues. A variety of substantive policy areas from clean air to toxic waste will be covered. Students will complete research papers on an environmental policy topic of their choice. Prerequisite: a 200-level course in American Government. {S} 4 credits

Donald Baumer

Offered Spring 2014


307 Seminar in American Government

Topic: Latinos and immigration Politics in the U.S. An examination of the role of Latinos in society and politics in the U.S. Issues to be analyzed include immigration, education, electoral politics, and gender.  {S} 4 credits

Velma Garcia

Offered Fall 2012


308 Seminar in American Government

Topic: Inequality, Social Policy, and the Politics of Methods. Who Counts? This seminar will examine the ways in which we ask and answer questions about inequality. We will study inequality and related social policy in the United States, with special attention to the methodological choices of the authors we read, and the kinds of answers that these methodological choices make possible or foreclose. We will draw on texts from political science, sociology, and anthropology, and the reading list for the course will be adjusted as we go to ensure that the interests of the participants in the seminar are well represented. {S} 4 credits

Jeremy Wolf

Offered Spring 2013


312 Seminar in American Government

Topic: Political Behavior in the United States. An examination of selected topics related to American political behavior. Themes include empirical analysis, partisanship, voting behavior and turnout, public opinion, and racial attitudes. Student projects will involve analysis of survey data. {S}  4 credits

Howard Gold

Offered Fall 2012


411 Washington Seminar in American Government

Policy-making in the national government. Open only to members of the Semester-in-Washington Program. Given in Washington, D.C. 4 credits

 TBA

Offered Fall 2012, Fall 2013


412 Semester-in-Washington Research Project

Open only to members of the Semester-in-Washington Program. 8 credits

Brent Durbin

Offered Fall 2012, Fall 2013


413 Washington Seminar: The Art and Craft of Political Science Research

This seminar is designed to provide students participating in the Washington Internship Program with an overview of the various approaches to conducting research in the discipline of political science. Students will be introduced to methods of quantitative and qualitative research, data acquisition and hypothesis testing. The seminar’s more specific goal is to help students understand the process of planning, organizing, and writing an analytical political science research paper. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors in the Washington Internship Program. {S} 2 credits

 TBA

Offered Fall 2012, Fall 2013


Comparative Government


220 Introduction to Comparative Politics

This course introduces students to comparative political analysis and provides a foundation to better understand major political, economic and social forces in a diverse set of countries. We will first focus on key methods and concepts such as state and nation, asking where states come from and how are nations built. The course will then address questions including: why are some countries democratic and others authoritarian; how do states promote or stymie economic development; and what role do civil society and social groups play in political and economic transition? The course combines theoretical and conceptual analysis with cases drawn from around the world. {S} 4 credits

Velma Garcia

Offered Spring 2013


221 European Politics

This course focuses on the development of European democratic institutions in the context of military and economic conflict and cooperation. Includes an introduction to the process of European integration. {S} 4 credits

Mlada Bukovansky

Offered Fall 2013


223 Russian Politics

After a brief discussion of the origins, evolution and collapse of the Soviet system, this course will focus on the politics of contemporary Russia. Issues to be addressed include constitutional change, electoral behavior, the role of civil society, and the course of economic reform. {S} 4 credits

Steven Goldstein

Offered Spring 2013, Spring 2014


224 Islam and Politics in the Middle East

An analysis of traditional Muslim political societies in the Middle East and of the many ways in which they were transformed into nation states. Issues addressed include nationalism, religious political activism, colonialism, and globalization. Readings will also cover such topics as regional conflicts, revolutions as well as the impact of these disparate developments on the position of women.  Not open to first-year students. {S} 4 credits

Donna Robinson Divine

Offered Fall 2012


226 Latin American Political Systems

A comparative analysis of Latin American political systems. Emphasis on the politics of development, the problems of leadership, legitimacy, and regime continuity. A wide range of countries and political issues will be covered. {S} 4 credits

Velma Garcia

Offered Fall 2012, Fall 2013


227 Contemporary African Politics

This survey course examines the ever-changing political and economic landscape of the African continent. The course aims to provide students with an understanding of the unique historical, economic and social variables that shape modern African politics, and will introduce students to various theoretical and analytical approaches to the study of Africa's political development. Central themes will include the ongoing processes of nation-building and democratization, the constitutional question, the international relations of Africa, issues of peace and security, and Africa's political economy. Enrollment limited to 35. {S} 4 credits

Noel Twagiramungu

Offered Spring 2013


GOV 228/EAS 228 Government and Politics of Japan

An introductory survey and analysis of the development of postwar Japanese politics. Emphasis on Japanese political culture and on formal and informal political institutions and processes, including political parties, the bureaucracy, interest groups and electoral and factional politics. {S} 

4 credits

Dennis Yasutomo

Offered Fall 2012, Fall 2013


230 Government and Politics of China

Treatment of traditional and transitional China, followed by analysis of the political system of the People's Republic of China. Discussion centers on such topics as problems of economic and social change, policy formulation, and patterns of party and state power. {S} 4 credits

Steven Goldstein

Offered Fall 2012, Fall 2013


237 Colloquium: Politics and the U.S./Mexico Border

This course examines the most important issues facing the U.S./Mexico border: NAFTA, industrialization, and the emergence of the maquiladoras (twin plants); labor migration and immigration; the environment; drug trafficking; the militarization of the border; and border culture and identity. The course begins with a comparison of contending perspectives on globalization before proceeding to a short overview of the historical literature on the creation of the U.S./Mexico border. Though at the present time the border has become increasingly militarized, the boundary dividing the U.S. and Mexico has traditionally been relatively porous, allowing people, capital, goods, and ideas to flow back and forth. The course will focus on the border as a region historically marked both by conflict and interdependence. Open to majors in Government and/or Latin American Studies; others by permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20.  {S} 4 credits

Velma Garcia

Offered Spring 2013


321 Seminar in Comparative Government

Topic: The Rwanda Genocide in Comparative Perspective. In 1994, Rwanda was engulfed by violence that caused untold human suffering, left more than half a million people dead, and reverberated throughout the Central African region. Using a comparative perspective, this seminar explores parallels and contrasts between Rwanda and other cases of genocide and mass murder in the 20th century. Topics include the nature, causes, and consequences of genocide in Rwanda, regional dynamics, the failure of the international community to intervene, and efforts to promote justice through the UN. International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. We will also consider theories of genocide and their applicability to Rwanda, exploring comparisons with other cases such as the Armenian genocide, the Holocaust, the destruction of the Herero, and war in Liberia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. {S} 4 credits

Noel Twagiramungu

Offered Spring 2013


322 Seminar in Comparative Government

Topic: Mexican Politics from 1910Present. An in-depth examination of contemporary political and social issues in Mexico. The country, once described as the "perfect dictatorship," is in the process of undergoing a series of deep political and economic changes. This seminar provides an examination of the historical foundations of modern Mexican politics, beginning with the Revolution. In addition, it examines a series of current challenges, including the transition from one-party rule, the neo liberal economic experiment and NAFTA, border issues, the impact of drug trafficking, and rebellion in Chiapas. {S} 4 credits

Velma Garcia

Offered Fall 2013


326 Seminar in Comparative Politics

Topic: Gender and the Politics of Development. A consideration of the classic works in political and economic development in the post WW II era. The specific focus of the course will be on the changing role of gender in the plans and programs of policy makers. Issues addressed will include population policy, agricultural development, political participation, education and health. {S} 4 credits

Susan C. Bourque

Offered Spring 2013


International Relations


241 is suggested preparation for all other courses in this field.


241 International Politics

An introduction to the theoretical and empirical analysis of the interactions of states in the international system. Emphasis is given to the historical evolution of the international system, security politics, the role of international norms in shaping behavior, and the influence of the world economy on international relations. Not a course in current events. Enrollment limited to 70. {S} 4 credits

Mlada Bukovansky, Fall 2012

Gregory White, Spring 2013

Brent Durbin, Fall 2013

Mlada Bukovansky, Spring 2014

Offered both semesters each year


242 International Political Economy

This course begins with an examination of the broad theoretical paradigms in international political economy (IPE), including the liberal, economic nationalist, structuralist, and feminist perspectives. The course analyzes critical debates in the post-World War II period, including the role of the Bretton Woods institutions (World Bank group and IMF), international trade and development, the debt question, poverty and global inequality, and the broad question of "globalization." Prerequisite: 241 or permission of the instructor. First-year students may enroll only if they have completed 241. Enrollment limited to 40. {S} 4 credits

Mlada Bukovansky, Fall 2013

Gregory White, Spring, 2014

Offered both semesters 2013-2014


244 Foreign Policy of the United States

In this course we ask and answer the following questions: Just what is “United States foreign policy?” By what processes does the U.S. define its interests in the global arena? What instruments does the U.S. possess to further those interests? Finally, what specific foreign policy questions are generating debate today? Prerequisite: 241 or permission of the instructor. {S} 4 credits

Brent Durbin

Offered Fall 2012, Spring 2014


249 Colloquium: International Human Rights

This course examines international human rights and the legal regime designed to protect them. Beginning with a theoretical inquiry into the justification of human rights, the course moves into an analysis of the contemporary system, from the UN to regional associations to NGOs. With that background in place, the course turns to specific topics, including the rights of vulnerable persons (women, children, minority communities, internally and externally displaced persons); human rights concerns arising from globalization and corporate responsibility; environmental concerns; and issues of peacekeeping. It concludes by examining enforcement strategies, from humanitarian intervention to political mobilization to judicial enforcement of rights in both domestic and international tribunals. Enrollment limited to 20. (E) {S} 4 credits

Alice Hearst

Offered Fall 2013


250 Case Studies in International Relations

In the course will focus on the global politics of energy, food, and water. The course will begin by considering the role of resource competition and resource scarcity in contemporary world affairs, and how these phenomena are likely to be affected by globalization, climate change, population growth, and the rise of new economic dynamos like China and India. It will then examine current trends regarding the global demand for and supply of energy, food, and water. Students will be expected to choose a particular country or problem for intensive study. {S} 4 credits

Michael Klare

Offered Spring 2014


251 Foreign Policy of Japan

Analysis of Japan's diplomacy and foreign policy since World War II. Emphasis on various approaches to the study of Japan's external relations, and on contending national identities debated in Japan, including pacifist, neo-mercantilist, civilian, normative and normal nation images. Case studies focus on relations with the U.S., Europe, East through Central Asia, and other non-Western regions. {S} 4 credits

Dennis Yasutomo

Offered Spring 2013, Spring 2014


252 International Organizations

What role do international organizations play in world politics, and what role should they play? Do international organizations represent humanity’s higher aspirations, or are they simply tools of the wealthy and powerful? This course explores the problems and processes of international organizations by drawing on theoretical, historical, and contemporary sources and perspectives. We focus on three contemporary organizations: the United Nations, the World Trade Organization, and the European Union. Prerequisite: 241 or permission of the instructor.   Not open to first-year students. {S} 4 credits

Mlada Bukovansky

Offered Fall 2012, Spring 2014


254 Colloquium: Politics of the Global Environment

An introductory survey of the environmental implications of the international political economy. The focus is on the changing role of the state and the politics of industrial development. Special emphasis is devoted to the controversies and issues that have emerged since the 1950s, including the tragedy of the commons, sustainable development, global warming, and environmental security. Special attention is also accorded to North-South relations and the politics of indigenous peoples. Prerequisite: 241 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20. {S} 4 credits

Gregory White

Offered Spring 2014


257 Refugee Politics

This course examines refugees—i.e., people displaced within their country, to another country or, perhaps, somewhere “in between.” Refugee politics prompt a consideration of the cause of refugee movements; persecution, flight, asylum, and resettlement dynamics; the international response to humanitarian crises; and the “position” of refugees in the international system. In addition to international relations theory, the seminar focuses on historical studies, international law, comparative politics, refugee policy studies and anthropological approaches to displacement and “foreignness.” Although special attention is devoted to Africa, other cases of refugee politics are examined. Open to majors in Government; others by permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 40. {S} 4 credits

Gregory White

Offered Fall 2012


341 Seminar in International Relations

Topic: Regional Powers. An introduction to the theoretical and empirical analysis of regional or emerging powers that challenge the hegemony of the West in the international system. Emphasis is given to political, economic, and social change in the wake of globalization turning the world into a multipolar one. We will also look into possible opportunities to address some of the pressing global problems (security, trade, finance, development, climate change, etc.) in the wake of newly emerging powers and the challenge they provide for international governmental organizations. {S} 4 credits

Cord Jakobeit

Offered Fall 2012


343 Seminar in International Politics and Comparative Politics

Topic: Corruption and Global Governance. What can international institutions such as the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank do about corruption? This seminar explores the theoretical and practical dimensions of the problem of corruption, and analyzes how states and international organizations have attempted to combat the problem. {S} 4 credits

Mlada Bukovansky

Offered Fall 2013


344 Seminar on Foreign Policy of the Chinese People's Republic

After examining the historical roots of the foreign policy of the People’s Republic of China both before and after its establishment in 1949, the seminar will focus on the process and substance of the nation’s contemporary international behavior. {S} 4 credits

Steven Goldstein

Offered Spring 2013, Spring 2014


345 Seminar in International Politics

Topic: Intelligence and National Security. How do governments learn about the threats facing them and their citizens? What is the proper balance between liberty and security in a democratic society? Why did the U.S. government fail to prevent the 9/11 attacks, and what can be done to ensure against such attacks in the future? This course considers these and other questions through the lens of the U.S. intelligence community. The modern American intelligence system was established in the wake of World War II, and has since grown to comprise eighteen different agencies requiring upwards of $50 billion per year in funding. We will review the history of this system, both at home and abroad, with special attention to the Central Intelligence Agency and its often controversial role in U.S. foreign policy. {S} 4 credits.

Brent Durbin

Offered Spring 2014


347 Seminar in International Politics and Comparative Politics

Topic: North Africa in the International System. This seminar examines the history and political economy of Morocco, Tunisia, and Algeria—the Maghreb—focusing on the post-independence era. Where relevant, Mauritania and Libya will be treated. The seminar sets Maghrebi politics in the broader context of its regional situation within the Mediterranean (Europe and the Middle East), as well as its relationship to sub-Saharan Africa and North America. Study is devoted to: 1) the independence struggle; 2) the colonial legacy; 3) contemporary political economy; and 4) post-colonial politics and society. Special attention will be devoted to the politics of Islam, the “status” of women, and democratization. {S} 4 credits

Gregory White

Offered Spring 2013, Fall 2013


348 Seminar in International Politics

Topic: Conflict and Cooperation in Asia. The seminar will identify and analyze the sources and patterns of conflict and cooperation among Asian states and between Asian and Western countries in the contemporary period. The course will conclude by evaluating prospects for current efforts to create a new “Asia Pacific Community.” Permission of the instructor is required. {S} 4 credits

Dennis Yasutomo

Offered Fall 2012, Fall 2013



Political Theory


261 Ancient and Medieval Political Theory

An examination of the great thinkers of the classical and (time permitting) medieval periods. Possible topics include: family and the state, freedom and the gods, war are faction, politics and philosophy, secular and religious authority, justice, citizenship, regimes, and natural law. Selected authors include: Sophocles, Aeschylus, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Xenophon, Plato, Aristotle, Polybius, Cicero, Lucretious, Augustine, Aquinas, and Marsilius. {S} 4 credits

Patrick Coby

Offered Fall 2012


263 Political Theory of the 19th Century

A study of the major liberal and radical political theories of the 19th century, with emphasis on the writings of Hegel, Marx, Tocqueville, Mill and Nietsche. Not open to first-year students. {S} 4 credits

Gary Lehring

Offered Spring 2013


264 American Political Thought

An examination of political thought in America from the colonial period to the present. Prominent themes include: politics and religion, constitutional structures, political parties, slavery, industrialization, welfare, foreign policy, and liberalism-conservatism. {S} 4 credits

Jeremy Wolf, Fall 2012

Patrick Coby, Fall 2013

Offered Fall 2012, Fall 2013


265 Reacting to the Past: American’s Founding

A departmental version of the historical role-playing First-Year Seminar by the same name, featuring games on the American Revolution and the Constitutional Convention. Course satisfies the department’s political theory requirement and is open to all levels of students. Enrollment limited to 26. {S} 4 credits

Patrick Coby

Offered Spring 2013, Spring 2014


267 Problems in Democratic Thought

What is democracy? We begin with readings of Aristotle, Rousseau, and Mill to introduce some issues associated with the ideal of democratic self-government: participation, equality, majority rule vs. minority rights, the common good, pluralism, community. Readings will include selections from liberal, radical, socialist, libertarian, multiculturalist and feminist political thought. Not open to first-year students. {S} 4 credits

Martha Ackelsberg

Offered Fall 2013


362 Seminar in Political Theory

Topic: Revolution to Consolidation. A look at how American political thinkers and activists justified a war for independence, puzzled through the construction of a new political order, thought about creating a democratic nation state, and argued over issues such as individual rights, the role of political parties, and the capabilities of citizens for self-government. We will look at specific debates between 1776 and 1800 and also an overview of the most important contributors: Jefferson, Madison, Hamilton, and John Adams. Prerequisite: Some previous course on American government or permission of the instructor. {S} 4 credits

Marc Lendler

Offered Fall 2013


366 Seminar in Political Theory

Topic: The Political Theory of Michel Foucault. This course will examine the work of Michel Foucault (1926-84), French philosopher, social critic, historian, and activist, and generally acknowledged as one of the most influential of the thinkers whose work is categorized as post-structuralist. Foucault's various inquiries into the production of knowledge and power have formed the paradoxically destabilizing foundation for much of the work on the status of the human subject in post-modernity. We will explore the theoretically rich and dense approaches undertaken by Foucault, as well as illuminating his central ideas that seem to challenge much of what political theory accepts as a given. From The Birth of the Clinic, The Order of Things, and Discipline and Punish to his later works including The History of Sexuality, The Use of Pleasure, and The Care of the Self attention will be given to how his works simultaneously advance and critique much of the canon of political theory. Prerequisite: Completion of Gov 100 and one other upper division political theory course or permission of the instructor. {S} 4 credits

Gary Lehring

Offered Spring 2013


Cross-listed Courses


EAS 200 Colloquium: Topics in East Asian Studies

{S} 4 credits

Dennis Yasutomo

Offered Spring 2013, Spring 2014


PRS 325 Political Economy of Humanitarianism

Mlada Bukovansky

Offered Spring 2013



404 Special Studies

Admission for majors by permission of the department.

4 credits

Offered both semesters each year


408d Special Studies

Admission for majors by permission of the department.

8 credits

Full-year course; Offered each year

The Major


Advisers: Martha Ackelsberg, Donald Baumer, Mlada Bukovansky, Patrick Coby, Donna Robinson Divine, Brent Durbin, Velma Garcia, Howard Gold, Steven Goldstein, Alice Hearst, Marc Lendler, Gary Lehring, Gregory White, Dennis Yasutomo


Graduate School Adviser: Steven Goldstein


Director of the Jean Picker Semester-in-Washington Program: Brent Durbin, 201–13.


Basis: 100. 


Requirements: 10 semester courses, including the following:

1. 100;

2. one course at the 200 level in each of the following fields: American government, comparative government, international relations, and political theory;

3. two additional courses, one of which must be a seminar, and both of which must be related to one of the courses taken under (2); they may be in the same sub-field of the department, or they may be in other sub-fields, in which case a rationale for their choice must be accepted by the student and her adviser; and

4. three additional elective courses. Majors are encouraged to select 190 as one of their electives.


Majors may spend the junior year abroad if they meet the college requirements.


The Minor


Advisers: Same as those listed for the major


Based on 100. The minor consists of 6 courses, which shall include 5 additional courses, including at least one course from two of the four fields identified as requirements for the major.


Honors


Director: Gary Lehring


430d Honors Project

8 credits


431 Honors Project

8 credits

Offered Fall 2012, Fall 2013


Please consult the director of honors or the departmental Web site for specific requirements and application procedures.


Jean Picker Semester-in-Washington Program


The Jean Picker Semester-in-Washington Program is a first-semester program open to Smith junior and senior government majors and to other Smith juniors and seniors with appropriate background in the social sciences. It provides students with an opportunity to study processes by which public policy is made and implemented at the national level. Students are normally resident in Washington from the June preceding the semester through December.

Applications for enrollment should be made through the director of the Semester-in-Washington Program no later than November 1 of the preceding year. Enrollment is limited to 12 students, and the program is not mounted for fewer than six.

Before beginning the semester in Washington, the student must have satisfactorily completed at least one course in American national government at the 200 level selected from the following courses: 200, 201, 202, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210 and 211. In addition, a successful applicant must show promise of capacity for independent work. An applicant must have an excess of two credits on her record preceding the semester in Washington.

For satisfactory completion of the Semester-in-Washington Program, 14 credits are granted: four credits for a seminar in policymaking (411); 2 credits for GOV 413, seminar on political science research; and eight credits for an independent research project (412), culminating in a long paper.

No student may write an honors thesis in the same field in which she has written her long paper in the Washington seminar, unless the department, upon petition, grants a specific exemption from this policy.

The program is directed by a member of the Smith College faculty, who is responsible for selecting the interns and assisting them in obtaining placement in appropriate offices in Washington, and directing the independent research project through tutorial sessions. The seminar is conducted by an adjunct professor resident in Washington.

Students participating in the program pay full tuition for the semester. They do not pay any fees for residence at the college, but are required to pay for their own room and board in Washington during the fall semester.



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