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This section contains an overview of the college's history, the academic program, the campus and student body; information on admission, fees and financial aid; graduate programs; and a key for deciphering course listings. Select a section from the dropdown menu to start.


This catalog contains policies and program descriptions and should be used solely as an informational guide. The General Information section is accurate as of July. All announcements herein are subject to revision. Students are responsible for informing themselves of current policies and meeting all relevant requirements.

This section details instructors, requirements for the majors and minors, and course offerings for the year (the data is updated annually). The Search for Courses tab enables you to search for courses based on interests and criteria. This tab will enable you to identify if a course can count toward a major, minor, concentration or a certificate.

Select a department or program from the dropdown menu.

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Professors
Margaret Sarkissian, Ph.D. †2
Joel Lee Pitchon, M.M.
Steve Waksman, Ph.D., Chair †1

Associate Professors
Judith Gordon, B.Mus.
Katharine P. Soper, D.M.A. **1

Assistant Professor
Andrea Moore, Ph.D. **2

Visiting Five College Professor
Olabode Omojola, Ph.D.

Senior Lecturers
Grant R. Moss, D.M.A. *1
Jonathan M. Hirsh, D.M.A., Director of Orchestral and Choral Activities

Lecturer
Marie-Volcy Pelletier, G.D.M.

Lecturer and Assistant Director of Choral Activities
Sarah Paquet, M.M.

Visiting Artist and Lecturer

Staff Pianist
Clifton J. Noble, M.A.

The Major

Advisers: Members of the department

Adviser for Study Abroad: TBA

Requirements: Ten semester courses and four credits in performance.The ten semester courses include the basis (102, 110, and 202), six additional classroom courses above the 100 level, and 325 in the senior year. Of the six additional classroom courses, at least one must be taken in three of the following areas:

  • History of Western music
  • World music
  • American music
  • Music theory and analysis
  • Composition and digital music
Other courses that are not covered by one of these five categories may be counted toward the major on a case-by-case basis, with special department approval.

In world music and in American music, 101 and 105 or 106, respectively, may be substituted for an additional classroom course above the 100 level.

The four credits in performance can be fulfilled by taking: two semesters of lessons on an instrument or in voice, or two semesters of conducting; or, four semesters of participation in an ensemble, which may be the same ensemble over four semesters, or may consist of participation in multiple ensembles as long as the four-semester requirement is met.

Students may be exempted from courses required for the basis of the major as a result of Advanced Placement exams or departmental placement tests. Such exemption does not affect the number of courses required for the major.

Students who are contemplating graduate work in any branch of music should consult an appropriate member of the department for advice in selecting suitable elective courses. Students interested in graduate work in music are urged to acquire some knowledge of German, French or Italian (for studies in the Western tradition) or of a relevant foreign language (for studies beyond the Western tradition).

With the approval of the department, students may substitute one 4-credit Special Studies for one of the six additional classroom courses in the major.

The S/U grading option is not allowed for courses counting towards the major, with the exception of ensembles that are graded S/U, that can be applied to the performance requirement.

Music Major with Concentration in Performance

Majors who have demonstrated an exceptional commitment to performance studies may, before March of their junior year, audition before a department committee for admission to the concentration in perfomrance, which consists of enrollment in MUS 940y and the preparation of a full recital during the senior year.

The Minor

Advisers: Members of the department

Requirements: Six semester courses, including the basis (102, 110, 202) and three additional classroom courses of which at least two should be above the 100 level. Students may be exempted from courses required for the basis of the minor as a result of Advanced Placement exams or departmental placement tests. Such exemption does not affect the number of courses required for the minor. The S/U grading option is not allowed for courses counting toward the minor.

Honors

Director: Raphael Atlas

Requirements: A g.p.a. of 3.5 in classroom courses in music through the end of the junior year; a g.p.a. of 3.3 in courses outside music through the end of the junior year. Honors students will fulfill the requirements of the major, will present a thesis or composition (430d or 431) equivalent to 8 credits, and will take an oral examination on the subject of the thesis. The thesis in history or cultural studies will normally be a research paper of approximately 50 pages. The thesis in composition will normally be a chamber work of substantial duration. The final grade (highest honors, high honors, honors, pass) will be calculated as follows: thesis (60 percent); grades in music (20 percent); performance on the oral examination (20 percent).
 
Examination: Students will take an oral examination on the subject of their thesis.

The Five College Ethnomusicology Certificate Program

Advisors: Members of the Five College Ethnomusicology Committee

The Certificate Program in Ethnomusicology will provide a coherent framework for navigating course offerings and engaging with ethnomusicologists throughout the Five Colleges.

Requirements: To obtain a Five College certificate in ethnomusicology, students must successfully complete a total of seven courses distributed as indicated in the following four categories. No more than five courses can be from any one department/discipline, and introductory courses in basic musicianship do not count towards the requirements:
 

  • Area studies or topics courses: at least two courses
  • Methodology: at least two courses
  • Performance: at least one course
  • Electives: negotiated in consultation with the student’s ethnomusicology adviser, including courses from related disciplines such as anthropology, sociology, history or media studies; area studies fields such as African studies, American studies, Asian studies or Middle East studies; or other fields related to a particular student’s ethnomusicological interests.

Since ethnomusicological research and related musical performance may require understanding of and competence in a foreign language, students are encouraged (but not required) to achieve relevant language proficiency. Other areas that students are encouraged to explore include experiential learning, a study-abroad or domestic-exchange experience, in-depth study of a single musical tradition or comparative studies of several musical traditions.

List of Courses and Ensembles
Will be posted and updated on our website: www.fivecolleges.edu/ethnomusicology

Introductory Courses



MUS 100 Colloquia
Colloquia are especially designed for those with no previous background in music. Limited to 20 students, they emphasize class discussion and written work, which consists of either music or critical prose as appropriate to the topic. Open to all students, but particularly recommended for first-year students and sophomores.

Fundamentals of Music
An introduction to music notation and to principles of musical organization, including scales, keys, rhythm and meter. Limited to beginners and those who did not place into 110. {A} Credits: 4
Members of the department
Normally offered each spring

FYS 100 My Music: Writing Musical Lives
This first-year seminar begins with an exploration of our own musical lives. What does the particular constellation of material that we call “My Music” tell us about who we are, where we come from, and how we relate to the world? After analyzing and comparing musical lives within the class, we will read selected case studies and collaboratively design a musical biography project. Each student will curate one person’s musical life story, gathering data through one-on-one interviews, weaving together their interlocutor’s words with their own interpretations, and ultimately reflecting on what they have learned from the experience. Enrollment limited to 16 first-year students. WI Credits: 4
Margaret Sarkissian
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

MUS 101 World Music
Music may not be a “universal language,” but it is a universal phenomenon; every culture has something that we recognize as music. This course introduces you to a number of musical systems—traditional, classical and popular—from around the world and uses case studies to explore the complex relationships between music and culture. By engaging with music analytically, as musicologists (paying attention to the sounds you hear) and ethnographically, as anthropologists (paying attention to the cultural context), you learn basic principles that enhance your understanding of music globally speaking. No prerequisites. {A} {S} Credits: 4
Margaret Sarkissian
Normally offered in alternate years

MUS 102 Politics, Power, Performance, Prestige: Making Music History
This class is an introduction to music history that combines a close study of music from the Western classical tradition with research methodology and an orientation to the discipline of musicology. Organized by genres and concepts, the class looks at classical music as both a repertoire and an object of cultural study. In addition to covering a range of works, we will address their production, performance, and reception through a study of their social and political context, and raise questions of power, representation, and patronage. We will also examine our own ideas about the role of the artist, what it means to be a musician, and the social future of this music. Students will have the chance to do original research on a piece or topic of their choice, and will get a foundation in the College’s scholarly resources, especially the holdings at Josten Library and Special Collections. {A} {H} Credits: 4
Andrea Moore
Normally offered each fall

MUS 105 Roll Over Beethoven: A History of Rock
This course provides a critical survey of rock music, tracing the music’s development from blues and blackface minstrelsy to heavy metal, grunge, and techno. Emphasis throughout is placed upon understanding musical developments in the context of American race and gender relations and the politics of youth cultures in the U.S. Topics to be covered include: Elvis Presley and American race relations; Jimi Hendrix and the blues; girl groups; the rise of arena rock; and the significance of the DJ in hip hop. Enrollment limited to 45. {A} {H} Credits: 4
Members of the department
Normally offered in alternate years

MUS 106 American Sounds
This course surveys developments in the history of American music, with a primary focus on the 20th century. We pay particular attention to blues and country music, two styles that arose early in the century and provided the foundation for much of what followed. The course may cover other styles such as: blackface minstrelsy, Tin Pan Alley, folk, jazz, classical or varieties of Latino music. Throughout, we attend to musical aspects of these styles, and connect them to larger historical themes and social issues concerning race, class, gender and the making of “American” identity through music. Formal knowledge of music is not required. Enrollment limited to 45. {A} {H} Credits: 4
Members of the department
Normally offered in alternate years

MUS 110 Analysis and Repertory
An introduction to formal analysis and tonal harmony, and a study of pieces in the standard repertory. Regular exercises in harmony. Prerequisites: ability to read standard notation in treble and bass clefs, including key signatures and time signatures, and the ability to name intervals. (A placement test is given before the fall semester for incoming students.) One 50-minute ear training section required per week, in addition to classroom meetings. Class sections limited to 20. {A} Credits: 0-4
Philip Acimovic
Normally offered each fall

MUS 120 Music Decoded: What Do You Hear?
The primary goal of this course is to deepen your understanding of the music you like, while forging connections to music that is unfamiliar to you, making you a more well-informed music consumer. Throughout the course, you hone active listening skills, helping you to identify technical components and to connect with the music on an emotional level. These skills help you describe more specifically what you hear, and decode increasingly complex music. Classes cover folk, popular, jazz, non-western classical and other styles. {A} Credits: 2
Sarah L Paquet
Normally offered each spring

Intermediate and Advanced Courses



MUS 202 Thinking About Music
This course explores different approaches to the study of music as a cultural phenomenon. We consider basic questions, such as: Why is music so often at the center of our most profound personal and social experiences? Why is music a fundamental means of connecting with our own lives, our communities and the wider world in which we live? Through in-depth reading and in-class discussion, we study the institutions of music (concerts, recording studios) and the varied practices of music making (classical, popular; amateur, professional) in order to construct a picture of the musical worlds around us and to understand what they tell us about the societies in which we live. {A} {S} Credits: 4
Margaret Sarkissian
Normally offered each spring

MUS 203 Music as Memorial and Monument
Music has long played an important role in both memorialization and monumentalization. In this class, we use music as a lens through which to consider the agendas and values behind public displays of memory, history, and political strength. We will study music written to commemorate victims of war, state violence, and illness, from requiems to 9/11 memorial works. We will also consider how composers, performers, and listeners have participated in monumentalizing historical or political occasions, from composer anniversary celebrations to national anthems. {A} {H} Credits: 4
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

MUS 205 Topics in Popular Music
Topics course.

Improvising History: The Development of Jazz
The course combines exploration of jazz music with examination of topics in the social and cultural history of jazz. Musically, the development of jazz is traced from the early styles that took root in New Orleans and Chicago to the challenging "free jazz" sounds of the 1960s and the 1970s, and into the current "postmodern" moment of jazz history. Historically, the course considers such issues as the key importance of race to the social development of jazz, the shifting status of jazz as "popular" or "art" music, and the nature and significance of improvisation as a medium of creative expression in 20th century American culture. Some previous knowledge of African American music and history or permission of the instructor required. Enrollment limited to 20. {A} Credits: 4
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

Metal and Punk: Rock History Out Loud
In-depth examination of the historical, musical and social development of heavy metal and punk rock, two key genres in the recent history of rock. In this course, we explore metal and punk as interrelated musical responses to the "crisis" that beset post-1960's rock, and use the two genres as a lens for examining the nature and definition of popular music genres, the status of rock music as commodity, the politics of "noise," and the shifting qualities of the rock audience from the 1970s to the present. Enrollment limited to 20 students. {A} Credits: 4
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

MUS 210 Analysis and Repertory
A continuation of 110. One 50-minute musicianship section required per week, in addition to classroom meetings. Prerequisite: 110 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 18. {A} Credits: 4
Philip Acimovic
Normally offered each spring

MUS 220 Topics in World Music
Topics course.

African Popular Music
This course focuses on twentieth century African popular music: it examines musical genres from different parts of the continent, investigating their relationships to the historical, political and social dynamics of their respective national and regional origins. Regional examples like highlife, soukous and mbaqanga will provide the basis for assessing the significance of popular music as a creative response to the colonial and postcolonial enviromnet in Africa. Themes explored include the use of music in the construction of social identity and the interaction of local and global elements. No prerequisites. Maximum enrollment 30 students. {A} {S} Credits: 4
Members of the department
Normally offered in alternate years

The Music of Japan
An introduction to the music of Japan focusing on selected ritual, instrumental, theatrical and popular music genres. In addition to placing music within its socio-cultural context, the course explores how distinctly Japanese genres have developed in response to internal social changes and contact with foreign cultures. No prerequisites. {A} {S} Credits: 4
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

AMS 220 Colloquium
Topics course.
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years.

Dance Music Sex Romance: Popular Music, Gender and Sexuality from Rock to Rap
Since the 1950s rock ‘n’ roll and other forms of youth-oriented popular music in the U.S. have embodied rebellion. Yet the rebellion that rock and other popular music styles like rap have offered has often been more available to men than women. Similarly, the sexual liberation associated with popular music in the rock and rap eras has been far more open to “straight” desires over “queer.” This course will examine how popular music from the 1950s to the present has been shaped by gender and sexuality, and the extent to which the music and its associated cultural practices have allowed artists and audiences to challenge gender and sexual norms, or alternately have served to reinforce those norms albeit with loud guitars and a heavy beat. Enrollment limited to 20 {A} {H} Credits: 4
Members of the department


MUS 231 From Goat Songs To Flash Mobs: Music and Theater
Music and theatre are both time-based arts that involve bodies in motion in front of an audience. Though they may be considered separate disciplines, the full extent of what they share often makes them wonderfully indistinguishable. This course probes the intersections of music and theatre through a survey of genres, works, artists, and practitioners. While material covered will include clearly relevant genres such as musicals and opera, the focus will be on more difficult to categorize topics such as performance art, immersive theatre, and experimental music, in an open-minded examination of what makes this alliance so compelling. Enrollment limit of 20. {A} Credits: 4
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

MUS 233 Composition
Basic techniques of composition, including melody, simple two-part writing and instrumentation. Analysis of representative literature. No previous composition experience required. Prerequisite: 110 or permission of the instructor. {A} Credits: 4
Katharine P. Soper
Normally offered each fall

FMS 235 Listening to Cinema
This course explores the sound worlds of narrative, experimental and documentary cinema. Emphasis is placed on critical listening with regular sound exercises and focused analysis of individual films. Topics addressed include the aesthetics and politics of listening; sound design; the voice; film music; and the history of sound technology. The first half of the course will be devoted to sound theory and practice, with sound-oriented readings drawn from disparate fields including philosophy, film theory, musicology and short fiction. In the second half, we will undertake an historical survey of sound technology since the late nineteenth century. {A} Credits: 4
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

MUS 249 Islamic Popular Music
Same as REL 249. Music is a complex issue in many Islamic societies. There are tensions between those who believe that music has no place in Islam and try to prohibit it, those for whom it is a central component of mystical devotion, and those who tolerate it, albeit within well-defined parameters. The debate intensifies in the case of popular music, a core part of the self-identification of young people everywhere. Despite this, there is an amazing variety of vibrant popular music throughout the Islamic world. This course explores the religious debates over music and the rich musical tradition (including religious music) in Islam. {A} {H} Credits: 4
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

MUS 250 The Original Instrument: Music for Voice
An introduction to a broad range of vocal music, from the Middle Ages to the present, and an investigation of such issues as text setting, interpretation, extended vocal techniques and the use of technology as it relates to vocal performance. Topics of study include chant, 19th-century art song, opera and experimental music. Composers to be considered include Hildegard of Bingen, Mozart and Wagner as well as such recent and contemporary figures as Meredith Monk, Pauline Oliveros and Julius Eastman, and popular artists including Beyoncé and Björk. Open to all students (including first-year students) who have had previous musical experience or who have obtained the permission of the instructor. {A} Credits: 4
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

MUS 251 History of Opera
This course offers an introduction to opera from the 16th to the 21st centuries, with an emphasis on gender performance, virtuosity, and the unique history of opera performance at Smith College. Earlier works include Monteverdi’s Orfeo, Handel’s Rodelinda, Mozart’s Marriage of Figaro, and Verdi’s Aida, while more modern and contemporary operas include Strauss’s Salome and Kaija Saariaho’s L’Amour du Loin. {A} {H} Credits: 4
Members of the department
Normally offered in alternate years

MUS 258 Performing Culture
Same as ANT 258. This course analyzes cultural performances as sites for the expression and formation of social identity. Students study various performance genres such as rituals, festivals, parades, cultural shows, music, dance and theater. Topics include expressive culture as resistance; debates around authenticity and heritage; the performance of race, class and ethnic identities; the construction of national identity; and the effects of globalization on indigenous performances. Permission of the instructor required. Enrollment limited to 30. {A} {S} Credits: 4
Margaret Sarkissian
Normally offered in alternate years

MUS 260 The Music of J.S. Bach
This course is an introduction to the music, life, and legacy of the composer Johann Sebastian Bach, whose music inspired generations of composers and performers across genres. In addition to studying some of his works in depth and his biography, we will explore the cultural and historical context in which he worked, raising questions about performance, instruments, religious life, and patronage. We also look at his influence on music in the nineteenth century, the controversies around his St. John Passion in the twentieth, and his legacy in the twenty-first century. {A} {H} Credits: 4
Andrea Moore
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

MUS 262 Experimental Music
What counts as music? Who decides? Can anyone make music? This course raises these and other questions by focusing on experimental music. We explore the history and practice of experimental music, focusing on text, graphic, and other forms of notation. We also look at the history of experimental music in performance, and make our own in-class performances of several key pieces. Through our reading and practice, we ask questions about musical authority, skill, and even failure, and the role of institutions in shaping our musical ideas. {A} {H} Credits: 4
Andrea Moore
Normally offered each spring

MUS 315 Digital Orchestration
A practical introduction to principles of orchestration at the digital audio workstation, the basis of the production studio for music in media today. Following models from chiefly late Romantic repertory, students explore various instrumental combinations among the four sections of the orchestra—strings, winds, brass, percussion— in their own digital realizations. Working with libraries of digital samples, they develop a foundation in the production of music for film and video. For a final project, they orchestrate a given piano piece of two to three minutes, and produce a sound file of their work. Prerequisite: MUS 210 and permission of the instructor. {A} Credits: 4
Members of the department
Normally offered each spring

MUS 325 Writing About Music
In this seminar, we consider various kinds of writing—from daily journalism and popular criticism to academic monographs and scholarly essays—that concern the broad history of music. Via regular writing assignments and group discussions of substance and style, students have opportunities to improve the mechanics, tone and range of their written prose. Required of senior majors; open to others by permission of the instructor. {A} Credits: 4
Andrea Moore
Normally offered each spring

MUS 341 Seminar in Composition
Prerequisite: a course in composition. Admission by permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit. {A} Credits: 4
Daniel Warner
Normally offered each spring

MUS 345 Electro-Acoustic Music
Introduction to musique concrète, analog synthesis, digital synthesis and sampling through practical work, assigned reading, and listening. Enrollment limited to eight. Permission of the instructor required. {A} Credits: 4
Katharine P. Soper
Normally offered each fall

MUS 400 Special Studies
In the history of Western music, world music, American music, composition and digital music, or music theory and analysis. For juniors and seniors, by permission of the department. Credits: 1-4
Members of the department
Normally offered both fall and spring semesters

MUS 430D Honors Project
Credits: 8
Members of the department
Normally offered each academic year

MUS 431 Honors Project
Credits: 8
Members of the department
Normally offered each fall

Graduate Courses

The department offers no graduate program but in exceptional circumstances considers admitting an advanced student whose independent studies leading to the A.M. degree would be overseen by the appropriate members of the faculty.

Performance

The music department offers a range of performance courses: individual lessons, numbered MUS 914Y, 924Y, 930Y and 940Y; chamber music (MUS 901); conducting (MUS 903); and large ensembles, numbered MUS 951 and above.

Auditions are held for individual lessons and for certain ensembles during the fall orientation period and the first days of each semester. Students are accepted on the basis of musicianship, competence and potential. With the exception of voice, some prior experience and the ability to music is assumed. There is a fee for lessons which is waived for music majors and minors. Other students are encouraged to apply for departmental scholarship funds. Should there be no Smith College faculty teaching a particular instrument, every effort is made to provide students with a qualified instructor.

Individual voice and instrument performance courses consist of weekly private lessons, with specific expectations determined by each instructor. Lessons require a yearlong commitment and are normally taken in addition to a regular course load. Two such courses may be taken concurrently with department approval. (This restriction does not apply to enrollment in MUS 901, MUS 903, or to participation in large ensembles for credit.)

No more than 24 credits in performance, including participation in various large ensembles,  may be counted toward graduation. All large ensembles are graded on an S/U basis. For more detailed information on instrumental and voice lessons, and a list of current faculty, visit the Music Department website, www.smith.edu/music.

All performance students are encouraged to study music in the classroom. Non-majors and non-minors should talk with their instructors about which courses best complement their interests.

Individual performance lessons carry the following numbering sequence and credits:

MUS 914Y First year of study
This is a full-year course. Credits: 4, at the completion of two semesters.  {A} Credits: 2
Normally offered each academic year

MUS 924Y Second year of study
This is a full-year course. Prerequisite: MUS 914Y. Credits: 4, at the completion of two semesters. {A} Credits: 2
Normally offered each academic year

MUS 930Y Third and fourth years of study
Prerequisite: MUS 924Y. This is a full-year course. Credits: 4, at the completion of two semesters. {A} Credits: 2
Normally offered each academic year

MUS 940Y Concentration in Performance
Reserved for seniors who have been approved for Concentration in Performance. Two hours of performance lessons per week during the senior year. Credits: 8, at the completion of two semesters. {A} Credits: 4
Normally offered each academic year

MUS 901 Chamber Music
Weekly meetings for exploration and coaching of varied repertory for duos and small ensembles. Open to instrumental students by permission of instructors. May be repeated for credit. {A} Credits: 1
Judith Gordon, Joel Lee Pitchon, Jiayan Sun
Normally offered both fall and spring semesters

MUS 903 Conducting
Introduction to the art of conducting. This course examines philosophical and practical aspects of the modern conductor’s role. Topics include a musical gestural vocabulary, baton technique and score study/internalization of the printed page. Prior music performance experience and study of Western music theory is highly recommended; instructor permission required. May be repeated for credit. {A} Credits: 2
Jonathan M. Hirsh
Normally offered in alternate years

Large Ensembles: Choral

All students are encouraged to join a choral ensemble. The dynamic Smith College Glee Club performs annually at Commencement and Family Weekends, Montage, Autumn Serenade, Christmas Vespers, and at various college events including Opening Convocation, Otelia Cromwell Day and Rally Day. The Glee Club selects music from a diverse repertoire, including major works for treble voices, jazz, contemporary, and folk music of the U.S. and from international traditions. Every spring, glee clubs from such universities as Harvard, Rutgers, Cornell, Michigan and Virginia come to campus to collaborate on a major work. Recent performances have included the Mozart Requiem, Orff’s Carmina Burana and Brahms’ Ein Deutsches Requiem. Auditions for Glee Club are normally held during orientation and the first two weeks of classes in both semesters.

 

Members of the Glee Club are eligible to audition for the highly selective Smith College Chamber Singers. The internationally known Chamber Singers have performed widely since 1951. Touring every two years, the program provides financial assistance enabling all members to tour regardless of financial need. Auditions for Chamber Singers are held after Glee Club auditions have concluded.

 

Students who would like to try singing in a choir for the first time should schedule an interview with the instructor of Introduction to Choral Singing, a course that introduces students to the world of choral music.

 

Introduction to Choral Singing, Glee Club and Chamber Singers meet on Mondays and/or Wednesdays in the late afternoon.

 



MUS 951 Introduction to Choral Singing
{A} Credits: 1
Sarah L Paquet
Normally offered both fall and spring semesters

MUS 952 Smith College Glee Club
{A} Credits: 1
Jonathan M. Hirsh
Normally offered both fall and spring semesters

MUS 953 Smith College Chamber Singers
{A} Credits: 1
Jonathan M. Hirsh
Normally offered both fall and spring semesters

Large Ensembles: Instrumental



MUS 954 Smith College Orchestra
A symphony orchestra open to Smith and Five College students, and members of the community. The orchestra gives at least one concert each semester and performs at annual events such as Family Weekend and Christmas vespers. Rehearsals on Tuesday evenings. {A} Credits: 1
Jonathan M. Hirsh
Normally offered both fall and spring semesters

MUS 955 Smith College Javanese Gamelan Ensemble
One rehearsal per week; one concert per semester. Open (subject to space) to Smith and Five College students, faculty and staff. No prior experience necessary. Rehearsals on Wednesday evenings. {A} Credits: 1
Maho Amy Ishiguro
Normally offered both fall and spring semesters

MUS 956 Smith College Jazz Ensemble
The jazz ensemble rehearses once per week on Wednesday evenings 7–9 p.m. in Earle Recital Hall, and performs at least one concert per semester. Favoring traditional big band instrumentation, and performing a variety of jazz styles, the ensemble is open to Smith and Five College students, as well as and members of the community (space permitting, and by permission of the instructor) with all levels of music training. Prior jazz experience is recommended but not required. {A} Credits: 1
Genevieve Rose
Normally offered both fall and spring semesters

MUS 957 Smith College Wind Ensemble
One rehearsal per week; at least one concert per semester. Open to Smith and Five College students, faculty, staff and members of the community with prior instrumental experience. {A} Credits: 1
Hannah Berube
Normally offered both fall and spring semesters

MUS 958 Smith College Irish Music Ensemble: The Wailing Banshees
One rehearsal per week; at least one concert per semester. Open by audition or permission of the director to Smith and Five College students, faculty and staff, and members of the community. {A} Credits: 1
Ellen Redman
Normally offered both fall and spring semesters

MUS 959 Handbell Choir
The choir rehearses twice weekly and performs at the Family Weekend Montage concert, the annual Advent Dinner for the Roman Catholic community, Christmas Vespers and the second semester Spring Ring. In addition, the choir occasionally performs in off-campus community concerts. Rehearsals are Tuesdays and Thursdays at 5 p.m. in the John M. Greene Hall Handbell Room. {A} Credits: 1
Grant R. Moss
Normally offered both fall and spring semesters

The Five College Collegium and Early Music at the Five Colleges

The Five College Early Music Program seeks to provide educational and musical experience for those interested in the instrumental and vocal music of the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the baroque period. An extensive collection of medieval, Renaissance, and baroque instruments is available to students for study and performance, and there are large holdings in the music libraries of the Five Colleges. Students may participate in the Five College Collegium (open by audition), may join ensembles organized on the various campuses, and may take, for a fee, individual and noncredit group instruction. More information may be found at www.fivecolleges.edu/earlymusic.

All majors offered at Smith (through departments and programs) have requirements and a curriculum that students must complete. However, it is also important to identify what a student will know or be able to do at the completion of the major.

Departments and programs have articulated the learning goals for their disciplines, and they are all listed on the Departmental Learning Goals page.

 


The information contained in the Courses of Study documents is accurate as of July. Smith College reserves the right to make changes to the Courses of Study, including changes in its course offerings, instructors, requirements for the majors and minors, and degree requirements. Course information contained herein is compiled by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty from data submitted by departments and programs. All data listed are as officially and formally approved by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty, the Committee on Academic Priorities, and the faculty-at-large. Additional information may be available on the individual Web sites of departments and programs.

Using the Catalog: Select a Tab to Start

General Information contains an overview of the college's history, the academic program, the campus and student body; information on admission, fees and financial aid; graduate programs; and a key for deciphering course listings.

Academic Programs includes information on all of the college's courses; majors, minors and concentrations; faculty directories; and requirements.

Course Search allows you to search a database of courses offered by Smith College. Information includes the course title, course description, department, subject, name of instructor(s), credits, meeting time, and curriculum distribution indication.

Select one term.

Credits
Select all or credit number. Only applicable credit numbers display in drop-down list.

Course number
Enter course number. The search selects all course numbers that include the entered course number. For example, entering course number 24 would select course number 246. Yearlong courses end in 'Y' or 'D'. To search for yearlong course enter just the number or the number followed by 'Y' or 'D'. This search is not case-sensitive. Partial course numbers can be entered.

Course Title or Keyword
Search for a word or phrase in a course title. This search is not case-sensitive. Partial course titles can be entered.

Curriculum Distribution
Course listings in this catalog indicate in curly brackets which area(s) of knowledge a given course covers. Please note that certain courses do not indicate any designation as decided by the department, program or instructor involved. Students who wish to become eligible for Latin Honors at graduation must elect at least one course (normally four credits) in each of the seven major fields of knowledge. (If a course is less than four credits but designated for Latin Honors, this will be indicated.)

The search will return courses with any one of the selected distributional groups. For example, if you select distributional groups Literature and Mathematics, you will select courses in Literature or courses in Mathematics or courses in Literature and Mathematics.

Writing Intensive available
Certain courses in Smith College place special emphasis on writing in one or more sections. These courses have the designation "Writing Intensive". Each first-year student is required, during her first or second semester at Smith, to complete at least one writing-intensive course.

Display
The Course Catalog Search Results displays the course section listing selected from the search criteria. Click on a course title for full information and description. Click on a department to view complete departmental listings.


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