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This section contains an overview of the college's history, the academic program, the campus and student body; information on admission, fees and financial aid; graduate programs; and a key for deciphering course listings. Select a section from the dropdown menu to start.


This catalog contains policies and program descriptions and should be used solely as an informational guide. The General Information section is accurate as of July. All announcements herein are subject to revision. Students are responsible for informing themselves of current policies and meeting all relevant requirements.

This section details instructors, requirements for the majors and minors, and course offerings for the year (the data is updated annually). The Search for Courses tab enables you to search for courses based on interests and criteria. This tab will enable you to identify if a course can count toward a major, minor, concentration or a certificate.

Select a department or program from the dropdown menu.

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Members of the Program Committee for the Study of Women and Gender 2019–20
Kelly P. Anderson, Ph.D., Lecturer in Study of Women and Gender
Elisabeth Brownell Armstrong, Ph.D., Professor of the Study of Women and Gender
Carrie N. Baker, J.D., Ph.D., Professor of the Study of Women and Gender, Director *2
Payal Banerjee, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology
Darcy C. Buerkle, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History †2
Ginetta E. B. Candelario, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology
Jennifer M. DeClue, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of the Study of Women and Gender †2
Randi Garcia, Ph.D., M.S., Assistant Professor of Psychology and of Statistical and Data Sciences **1
Jennifer Mary Guglielmo, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History †1
Ambreen Hai, Ph.D., Professor of English Language and Literature
Laura Aline Katz, Ph.D., Elsie Damon Simonds Professor of Biological Sciences
Alexandra Linden Miller Keller, Ph.D., Professor of Film Studies
Jina Kim, Assistant Professor of the Study of Women and Gender and English
Kimberly Kono, Ph.D., Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Literature
Daphne M. Lamothe, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Africana Studies
Mehammed A. Mack, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French Studies **2
Cornelia D.J. Pearsall, Ph.D., Professor of English Language and Literature †2
Elizabeth S. Pryor, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History


Director: The chair of the program committee will serve as the director of the major and the minor and will verify completion of the major and the minor on recommendation of the student’s adviser.

The Major

The Program for the Study of Women and Gender examines gender, race, class and sexuality as important and simultaneous aspects of social worlds and human lives. This examination requires inquiry into the construction and operation of power relations, social inequalities and resistances to injustice in both national and transnational contexts. We understand women, gender, feminism and queer as politicized terms. As categories of analysis they help reveal how subjects become racialized, sexualized, gendered and class located.

Building on its origins in women’s studies, our program continues to examine the experiences, ideologies, works and actions of women in a variety of national, cultural, historical and political contexts. As an interdisciplinary endeavor, the study of women and gender shows students how different academic disciplines view the operation of gender in the labor market, the family, political systems and cultural production. Research and theory emerge from these everyday realities and, in turn, feminist theory informs our analysis of political choices and our understanding of the forms of activism around the globe.

Requirements

The major requires the completion of 10 semester courses, including at least two 300-level seminars, totaling 40 credit hours. These courses shall comprise SWG prefix courses and department-based courses chosen from a list of possibilities compiled yearly by the Program for the Study of Women and Gender. These courses must include: 

1. SWG 150 Introduction to the Study of Women and Gender (normally taken in the first or second year; may not be elected S/U)
2. One course with a Queer Studies focus
3. One course with a Race and Ethnicity Studies focus
4. One course with a Transnational, Postcolonial or Diasporic Studies focus
5. Four courses with the SWG prefix, including 150 and one 300-level seminar
6. Two 300-level courses (total)

A single course can be used to fill more than one of these requirements. Transfer students are expected to complete at least half of their major (or five courses) at Smith (or with approved Five College courses). Students with double majors may count a maximum of three courses toward both majors.

In the senior year, a student will complete a statement reflecting on the connections among the courses in their major. The senior statement and SWG advising checklist are due to the faculty adviser by the Friday prior to spring break.

The Minor

Requirements
The minor requires the completion of six semester courses, totaling 24 credit hours from SWG-prefix courses or cross-listed courses.  These courses must include:

1. SWG 150, Introduction to the Study of Women and Gender (normally taken in the first or second year, and which may not be elected S/U)
2. One course with a Queer Studies focus
3. One course with a Race and Ethnicity Studies focus
4. One course with a Transnational, Postcolonial, or Diasporic Studies focus


A Single course can be used to fill more than one of these requirements.  Minors are strongly encouraged to elect at least one course at the 300 level.

Advising

All members of the Program Committee for the Study of Women and Gender serve as advisers for the major and minor.

Honors

A student may honor in SWG by completing an 8-credit, two-semester thesis in addition to the 10 courses in the major and fulfilling all the general requirements. Eligibility of students for honors work, and supervision and evaluation of the thesis, are determined by the Program Committee for the Study of Women and Gender.



SWG 400 Special Studies
For qualified juniors and seniors. Admission by permission of the instructor and director of the program. No more than 4 special studies credits may be taken in any academic year and no more than 8 special studies credits total may be applied toward the major. Credits: 1-4
Members of the department
Normally offered each academic year

SWG 430D Honors Project
An 8-credit, two-semester thesis in addition to the 10 courses that fulfill the major. Eligibility requirements for honors work, and supervision and evaluation of the thesis are determined by the Program Committee for the Study of Women and Gender as outlined on the Program website at www.smith.edu/swg/honors.html. Credits: 4
Members of the department
Normally offered each academic year
Courses with SWG prefix or taught by SWG faculty in 2019-20

SWG 150 Introduction to the Study of Women and Gender
An introduction to the interdisciplinary field of the study of women and gender through a critical examination of feminist histories, issues and practices. Focus on the U.S. with some attention to the global context. Primarily for first- and second-year students, the course includes lecture and discussion, and students are assigned to sections. Enrollment limited to 30.  {H} {S} Credits: 4
Kelly P. Anderson, Elisabeth Brownell Armstrong, Carrie N. Baker, Jina Boyong Kim
Normally offered both fall and spring semesters

SWG 220 Introduction to Queer Studies
This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of queer studies, including its historical formations and recent innovations. Particular attention will be paid to the roots of queer theory in feminist theories of subjectivity and desire, queer of color critique, and queer critiques of traditional domains of knowledge production. Prerequisite: SWG 150 or permission of the instructor. {A} {S} Credits: 4
Catherine Victoria Dawson
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

SWG 222 Gender, Law and Policy
This course explores the impact of gender on law and policy  in the United States historically and today, focusing in the areas of constitutional equality, employment, education, reproduction, the family, violence against women, and immigration. We study constitutional and statutory law as well as public policy. Some of the topics we will cover are sexual orientation and gender identity discrimination, pregnancy/caregiver discrimination, pay equity, sexual harassment, school athletics, marriage, sterilization, contraception and abortion, reproductive technologies, sexual assault, intimate partner violence, and gender-based asylum. We will study feminist efforts to reform the law and examine how inequalities based on gender, race, class and sexuality shape the law. We also discuss and debate contemporary policy and future directions. {H} {S} Credits: 4
Carrie N. Baker
Normally offered each fall

SWG 227 Feminist and Queer Disability Studies 
In the essay “A Burst of Light: Living with Cancer,” writer-activist Audre Lorde forges pioneering connections between the work of social justice and the environmental, gendered, and healthcare inequities that circumscribe black and brown lives. Following Lorde’s intervention, this course examines contemporary feminist/queer expressive culture, writing, and theory that centrally engages the category of dis/ability. It will familiarize students with feminist and queer scholarship that resists the medical pathologization of embodied difference; foreground dis/ability’s intersections with questions of race, class, and nation; and ask what political and social liberation might look like when able-bodiedness is no longer privileged. Prerequisite: SWG 150. Enrollment limited to 20.  {A} {L} Credits: 4
Members of the department
Normally offered in alternate years

SWG 228 Theorizing Queer Feminism
This course is an introduction to queer feminist theory. We will consider varied articulations of both feminism and queerness and ways the relationship between them has been narrated and debated. Questions explored include: what might it mean to “queer” feminism? What might it mean to understand queerness through a feminist lens? How might we understand the place of the figure of the lesbian in imagining queer feminism? What sorts of ethical questions might queer feminist perspectives center? Concepts explored include: the centrality of race to concepts of gender and sexuality, relationships among feminist, queer, and trans studies, and sexual ethics. Prerequisite: SWG 150.
Angela Willey
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

SWG 230 Gender, Land and Food Movements
We begin this course by working alongside Gardening the Community, a youth-based and anti-racist food and land movement in Springfield, MA. We center our studies on both regional and transnational women’s movements across the globe to develop our understanding about current economic trends in globalization processes. Through the insights of transnational feminist analysis, we map the history of land and food to imagine a more equitable present and future. Students will develop a community-based research project that spans issues of climate change, environmentalism, critical race analysis and feminism, write papers and written reflections about their work. Prerequisite: SWG 150. {H} {S} Credits: 4
Elisabeth Brownell Armstrong
Normally offered each fall

SWG 233 Gender and Sexuality in Asian America
Dragon ladies, lotus blossoms, geisha girls: The U.S. cultural imaginary is saturated with myths regarding Asian sexuality and gender. This interdisciplinary course intervenes into this dominant imaginary by exploring feminist and queer frameworks derived from Asian American contexts: immigration, labor, militarism, so-called “terrorism,” beauty, family, and movement-building. Through a mix of scholarly, creative, activist, literary, and media texts, we will challenge preconceived notions of Asian Americans as “model minorities,” repressed, politically regressive, or hyper-sexual, as well as explore the diversity of Asian American gender and sexuality offered within literature, film, performance, and culture. Prerequisite: SWG 150.  {A} {L}
Jina Boyong Kim
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

SWG 238 Women, Money and Transnational Social Movements
Flickers of global finance capital across computer screens cannot compare to the travel preparations of women migrating from rural homes to work at computer chip factories. Yet both movements, of capital and people, constitute vital facets of globalization in our current era. This course centers on the political linkages and economic theories that address the politics of women, gender relations and capitalism. We will research social movements that challenge the raced, classed and gendered inequities, and the costs of maintaining order. We will assess the alternatives proposed by social movements like the landless workers movement (MST) in Brazil, and economic shifts like the workers cooperative movement. Assignments include community-based research on local and global political movements, short papers, class-led discussions & written reflections. {S} Credits: 4
Elisabeth Brownell Armstrong
Normally offered each spring

SWG 241 White Supremacy in the Age of Trump
This course will analyze the history, prevalence, and current manifestations of the white supremacist movement by examining ideological components, tactics and strategies, and its relationship to mainstream politics. We will also research and discuss the relationship between white supremacy and white privilege, and explore how to build a human rights movement to counter the white supremacist movement in the U.S. Students will develop analytical writing and research skills, while engaging in multiple cultural perspectives. The overall goal is to develop the capacity to understand the range of possible responses to white supremacy, both its legal and extralegal forms. Enrollment limited to 50.  {H} {S} Credits: 4
Loretta June Ross
Normally offered both fall and spring semesters

SWG 271 Colloquium: Reproductive Justice
This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of reproductive health, rights and justice in the United States, examining history, activism, law, policy, and public discourses related to reproduction. A central framework for analysis is how gender, race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, disability and nationality intersect to shape people’s experiences of reproductive oppression and their resistance strategies. Topics include eugenics and the birth control movement; the reproductive rights and justice movements; U.S. population control policies; criminalization of pregnant people; fetal personhood and birth parents’ citizenship; the medicalization of reproduction; reproductive technologies; the influence of disability, incarceration and poverty on pregnancy and parenting; the anti-abortion movement; and reproductive coercion and violence.  Prerequisite SWG 150 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 20. {S} Credits: 4
Carrie N. Baker
Normally offered each spring

SWG 290 Gender, Sexuality and Popular Culture
In this course we will consider the manner in which norms of gender and sexuality are reflected, reinforced, and challenged in popular culture.  We use theories of knowledge production, representation, and meaning-making to support our analysis of the relationship between discourse and power; our engagement with these theoretical texts helps us track this dynamic as it emerges in popular culture. Key queer theoretical concepts provide a framework for examining how the production gender and sexuality impacts cultural production. Through our critical engagement with a selection of films, music, television, visual art, and digital media we will discuss mainstream conventions and the feminist, queer, and queer of color interventions that enliven the landscape of popular culture with which we contend in everyday life. Enrollment limited to 25.
Prerequisite: SWG 150 or permission of the instructor.  Credits: 4
Members of the department
Normally offered each spring

All 300-level courses in the Study of Women and Gender are seminars and are normally limited to 12 juniors or seniors; seminars have prerequisites and all require permission of the instructor to enroll.


SWG 305 Queer Histories & Cultures
This course is an advanced seminar in the growing field of queer American history. Over the course of the semester, we will explore the histories of same-sex desire, practice, and identity, as well as gender transgressions, from the late 19th century to the present. Using a wide range of sources, including archival documents, films, work by historians, and oral histories, we will investigate how and why people with same-sex desire and non-normative gender expressions formed communities, struggled against bigotry, and organized movements for social and political change. This course will pay close attention to the intersections of race, gender, class, and sexuality and the ways that difference has shaped queer history. Not open to first-years and sophomores. Prerequisite: SWG 150 and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. {H} Credits: 4
Kelly P. Anderson
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

SWG 318 Women Against Empire
Anti-imperialist movements across the globe in the 20th century carried with them multiple projects for the liberation and equality of people. These movements sought to build sovereign nations independent of colonial power and to develop radically new social orders. For women in these movements, the problem of empire had complex regional and local inflections that began with the politics of reproduction. This course will look at three sites of women’s involvement contesting empire: first, the struggles of anti-imperial movements, second, women in the nationalist movements after formal independence and third, women’s movements in the current age of empire that has developed alongside the stealth of economic globalization and remote-control warfare. Prerequisite: SWG 150 and permission of the instructor.  {H} {S} Credits: 4
Members of the department
Normally offered in alternate years

SWG 321 Marxist Feminism
Marxist feminism as a theory and a politics imagines alternate, liberatory futures and critiques present social orders. Beginning with a simple insight: capitalism relies on the class politics of unpaid, reproductive “women’s work,” Marxist feminists in the 19th century sought to imagine new social connections, sexualities, and desire to overthrow patriarchy, slavery, feudalism and colonialism. Today, queer of color & decolonial feminist theory, alongside abolition, environmental, and reproduction justice movements rejuvenate this tradition of Marxist feminism. This seminar will focus on theoretical writings from around the world to better understand radical social movements from the past and the present. Prerequisite: SWG 150 and permission of the instructor.  {H} {L} Credits: 4
Elisabeth Brownell Armstrong
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

SWG 323 Sex, Trade and Trafficking
This seminar is an interdisciplinary examination of the international and domestic sex trade and trafficking involving women and girls, including sex trafficking; commercial sexual exploitation of girls; brokered, forced and child marriage; and sex work. We explore the social, economic and political conditions that shape these practices, including poverty and wealth inequality, globalization, war, technology, restrictions on migration, and ideologies of race, gender and nation. We also examine the social movements that address sex trafficking and sex work, particularly divisions among activists working on these issues, and learn about and assess anti-trafficking laws and public policies. Throughout the seminar, we analyze these issues from a feminist intersectional perspective. Prerequisite: SWG 150 and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. {S} Credits: 4
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

SWG 329 LGBTQ Politics and Postcolonialism
This seminar covers legal, activist, and historical debates on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer politics in British Commonwealth countries. Focusing on Indian LGBTQ movements’ efforts to overturn federal laws that harm queer and transgender people there, the course will move to cover discourses on these issues in other Commonwealth countries, including Uganda, Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica and Nigeria. The seminar discusses efforts to repeal colonial era anti-sodomy law still in effect in countries in the Global South that were once part of the British Empire.
Prerequisite: SWG 150. Enrollment limited to 12.  {H} {S} Credits: 4
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

SWG 333 Sexual Harassment and Social Change
This course is an interdisciplinary examination of sexual harassment and assault historically and today in a variety of locations, including the workplace, schools, the home, the military, and on the street. We will explore the emergence and evolution of social movements against sexual harassment and assault, and how these movements advanced law and public policy on these issues in the United States. A central focus will be on how relations of power based on gender, race, class, sexuality, age, disability, and nationality shape people’s experiences of sexual harassment and assault and their responses to it. Prerequisite: SWG 150 and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. {H} {S} Credits: 4
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

SWG 360 Memoir Writing
How does one write a life, especially if it’s one’s own? This writing workshop addresses the profound complexities, challenges, and pleasures of the genre of the memoir, through intensive reading, discussion, and both analytical and creative writing. Our readings will be drawn from a range of mostly contemporary memoirists with intersectional identity locations—and dislocations—drawing from a range of voices, experiences, and representations, pursuing what the class comes to identify as our own most urgent aesthetic and ethical questions. Our attention will be to craft, both in the memoirs we read and those we write. Writing sample and permission of the instructor required. Enrollment limited to 12.  {H} {L} Credits: 4
Cornelia D.J. Pearsall
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

The following courses may count toward the major and minor in the Study of Women and Gender with the approval of the adviser. Please see the SWG program website or the Smith College catalogue for descriptions.


AFR 111 Introduction to Black Culture
Flavia Santos De Araujo
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

AFR 155 Introduction to Black Women’s Studies
Flavia Santos De Araujo
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

AFR 212 Family Matters: Representations, Policy and the Black Family
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

AFR 243 Black Activist Autobiography
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

AFR 249 Black Women Writers
Daphne M. Lamothe
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

AFR 289 (C) Race, Feminism and Resistance in Movements for Social Change
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

AFR 360 Seminar: Toni Morrison
Flavia Santos De Araujo
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

AFR 366 Seminar: Contemporary Topics in Africana Studies

Seminar: The Politics of Grief

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

AMS 201 Introduction to the Study of American Society and Culture
Evangeline M. Heiliger, Kevin L. Rozario
Normally offered each spring

AMS 240 Introduction to Disability Studies
Holly Pearson
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

AMS 310 Performing Deviant Bodies
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

AMS 351 Seminar: Writing About American Society

Writing Women

Members of the department
Normally offered each academic year

Audio as a Narrative

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

ANT 347 Seminar: Topics in Anthropology

Prehistory of Food

Members of the department
Normally offered in alternate years

ANT 250 The Anthropology of Reproduction
Suzanne K. Gottschang
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

ANT 253 Introduction to East Asian Societies and Cultures
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

ANT 257 Urban Anthropology
Members of the department
Normally offered in alternate years

ARH 374 Studies in 20th-Century Art

Gender, Sexuality and the Built Environment

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

BIO 351 Topics in Evolutionary Biology

Evolution of Mammalian Reproduction: A Female Perspective

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

CLS 233 Gender and Sexuality in Greco-Roman Culture
Nancy J. Shumate
Normally offered in alternate years

WLT 100 Introduction to Comparative Literature: The Pleasures of Reading

Cannibals, Witches and Virgins

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

WLT 205 20th-Century Literatures of Africa
Katwiwa Mule
Normally offered each fall

WLT 232 Modern Chinese Literature
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

CLT 239 Intimacy in Contemporary Chinese Women’s Fiction
Members of the department
Normally offered each fall

CLT 260 Health and Illness: Literary Explorations
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

WLT 266 Studies in South African Literature and Film

Modern South African Literature and Cinema

Members of the department
Normally offered each spring

CLT 268 Transnational Latina Feminisms
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

CLT 342 Seminar: A Double Vision: Heroine/Victim
Members of the department
Normally offered in alternate years

EAL 232 Modern Chinese Literature
Members of the department
Normally offered each fall

EAL 239 Intimacy in Contemporary Chinese Women’s Fiction
Members of the department
Normally offered each spring

EAL 242 Modern Japanese Literature
Kimberly Kono
Normally offered each fall

EAL 245 Writing, Japan and Otherness
Kimberly Kono
Normally offered each spring

EAL 252 Women in Korean Cinema
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

EAL 261 Gender and Sexuality in Late Imperial Chinese Literature
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

EAL 262 Representation of Women in Chinese Culture
Lingqian Kong
Normally offered each spring

EAL 273 Women and Narration in Modern Korea
Irhe Sohn
Normally offered each spring

ENG 119 Writing Roundtable

New Topic

Members of the department


This Overheating World

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

What's for Dinner? Writing About Food

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

Language & Power

Members of the department
Normally offered each spring

ENG 223 Contemporary American Gothic Literature
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

ENG 224 Frankenstein: The Making of a Monster
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

ENG 229 Turning Novels into Films: Imperialism, Race, Gender and Cinematic Adaptation
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

ENG 241 The Empire Writes Back: Postcolonial Literature
Ambreen Hai
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

ENG 243 The Victorian Novel
Cornelia D.J. Pearsall
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

ENG 270 Race and the Graphic Novel
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

ENG 279 American Women Poets
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

ENG 288 Native American Women and Non-Binary Writers
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

ENG 290 Crafting Creative Nonfiction

Topic: Writing Women

Members of the department
Normally offered each academic year

ENG 323 Seminar: Toni Morrison
Flavia Santos De Araujo
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

ENG 384 Writing About American Society

varying topics

Members of the department
Normally offered each academic year

Audio as a Narrative Technology

Members of the department
Normally offered each spring

Writing about Women and Gender

Members of the department
Normally offered each academic year

ENG 391 Modern South Asian Writers in English
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

ESS 200 Sport: In Search of the American Dream
Brittney Justine Randolph, Erica S. Tibbetts
Normally offered in alternate years

ESS 230 Body Images and Sport Media
Members of the department
Normally offered in alternate years

ESS 340 Women’s Health: Current Topics
Barbara Brehm-Curtis
Normally offered each academic year

FLS 250 Queer Cinema/Queer Media
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

FMS 245 Melodrama and Power:  Genre, Gender and Race
Sebnem Baran
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

FMS 261 Video Games and the Politics of Play
Members of the department
Normally offered in alternate years

FRN 230 Colloquium in French Studies

“Banlieue Lit”

Members of the department
Normally offered each academic year

FRN 320 Women Defamed, Women Defended
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

FRN 340 Topics in 17th- and 18th-Century Literature

Marie Antoinette's Semiotic Body

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

"Family Values" in the Enlightenment

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

Social Networking in Early Modern France–A Digital Humanities Approach

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

FRN 380 Topics in French Cultural Studies

Immigration and Sexuality

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

French Travel Writing and Self-Discovery

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

FYS 129 Tierra y Vida: Land and the Ecological Imagination in U.S. Latino/a Literature
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

FYS 153 The Bollywood Matinee: Gender, Nation and Globalization Through the Lens of Popular Indian Cinema
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

FYS 166 Mammalian Reproduction: A Female Perspective
Virginia Hayssen
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

FYS 175 Love Stories
Ambreen Hai
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

FYS 179 Rebellious Women
Kelly P. Anderson
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

FYS 183 Geisha, Wise Mothers, and Working Women
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

FYS 184 Educating Women: A History and Sociology, at Home and Abroad
Rosetta Marantz Cohen
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

FYS 199 Re-Membering Marie Antoinette
Janie M. Vanpee
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

GOV 231 Colloquium: Women's Social Movements in the Middle East
Bozena C. Welborne
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

GOV 233 Problems in Political Development
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

GOV 237 Colloquium: Politics of the U.S./Mexico Border
Velma E. Garcia
Normally offered each spring

GOV 249 International Human Rights
Alice L. Hearst
Normally offered in alternate years

GOV 266 Contemporary Political Theory
Members of the department
Normally offered in alternate years

GOV 267 Problems in Democratic Thought
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

GOV 269 Politics of Gender and Society
Members of the department
Normally offered in alternate years

GOV 305 Seminar in American Government

Strange Bedfellows: State Power and Regulation of the Family

Members of the department
Normally offered in alternate years

GOV 363 Civil Disobedience
Erin R. Pineda
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

GOV 367 Seminar in Political Theory

Politics, Wealth and Inequality

Members of the department
Normally offered in alternate years

HST 209 (C) Aspects of Middle Eastern History

Women, Gender and Power in the Middle East

Members of the department
Normally offered each academic year

HST 223 (C) Women and Gender in Japanese History

Women in Japanese History From Ancient Times to the 19th Century

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

HST 238 (C) Gender and the British Empire
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

HST 259 (C) Aspects of African History

Femininities, Masculinities and Sexualities in Africa

Members of the department
Normally offered in alternate years

HST 252 (L) Women and Gender in Modern Europe, 1789–1918
Darcy C. Buerkle
Normally offered each academic year

HST 256 (L) Making of Colonial West Africa: Race, Power and Society
Members of the department
Normally offered each academic year

HST 263 (C) Aspects of Latin American History
Diana Sierra Becerra


Women and Gender in Latin America

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

HST 264 Women and Revolutions
Diana Sierra Becerra
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

HST 265 (L) Race, Gender and United States Citizenship, 1776–1861
Members of the department
Normally offered each fall

HST 270 (C) Aspects of American History

Oral History and Lesbian Subjects

Members of the department
Normally offered in alternate years

Anatomy of a Slave Revolt

Members of the department
Normally offered in alternate years

HST 278 (L) Decolonizing U.S. Women’s History 1848–Present
Members of the department
Normally offered each academic year

HST 280 (C) Inquiries into United States Social History

Im/migration and Transnational Cultures in US History

Members of the department
Normally offered each academic year

HST 286 (C) Historiographic Debates in the History of Gender and Sexuality
Members of the department


HST 313 Seminar: Problems in East Asian History

Writing Gender Histories of East Asia

Members of the department
Normally offered in alternate years

HST 355 Seminar: Topics in Social History

Interrogating Gandhi Beyond the Myth of the Mahatma

Members of the department


History of Gender and Humanitarianism

Members of the department
Normally offered each academic year

Debates in the History of Gender and Sexuality

Members of the department


Recent Historiographic Debates in Gender and Sexuality

Members of the department
Normally offered each academic year

Gender and the Aftermath of War in the Twentieth Century

Members of the department
Normally offered each academic year

Women and World War I: The Smith College Relief Unit

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

HST 371 Seminar: Problems in 19th-Century United States History

African American Radicalism

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

Remembering Slavery: A Gendered Reading of the WPA Slave Interviews

Members of the department
Normally offered each academic year

HST 383 Seminar: Research in United States Women’s History: Domestic Worker Organizing
Elizabeth S. Pryor
Normally offered each academic year

IDP 208 Women’s Medical Issues
Leslie Richard Jaffe
Normally offered each spring

IDP 320 Seminar on Global Learning: Women’s Health in India, Including Tibetans Living in Exile
Members of the department
Normally offered each fall

ITL 344 Senior Seminar: Italian Women Writers

Women in Italian Society: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

JUD 215 What Matters

Antisemitism

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

George Eliot's Daniel Deronda

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

LAS 201 Colloquium in Latin American and Latino/a Studies

Latin American Economic History, 1825–present

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

LAS 260 (L) Colonial Latin America, 1492–1821
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

LAS 264 Women and Revolutions
Diana Sierra Becerra
Normally offered each spring

LAS 301 Seminar: Topics in Latin American and Latino/a Studies

Sexual and Reproductive Rights in Latin America

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

Women & Gender in Latin American History

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

Latina/o Racial Identities in the United States

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

PHI 210 Colloquium: Issues in Recent and Contemporary Philosophy

African-American Philosophy

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

Angela Davis

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

Animal Rights

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

POR 381 Seminar in Portuguese and Brazilian Studies

Multiple Lenses of Marginality: New Brazilian Filmmaking by Women

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

PSY 140 Health Psychology
Benita Sibia Jackson
Normally offered each academic year

PSY 166 Introduction to the Psychology of Gender
Lauren E. Duncan
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

PSY 265 Colloquium: Political Psychology
Members of the department
Normally offered each academic year

PSY 345 Feminist Perspective on Psychological Science
Members of the department
Normally offered in alternate years

PSY 374 Psychology of Political Activism
Members of the department
Normally offered in alternate years

PSY 375 Research Seminar on Political Psychology
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

REL 214 Women in the Hebrew Bible
Joel S. Kaminsky
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

REL 227 Women and Gender in Jewish History
Lois C. Dubin
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

REL 238 Mary: Images and Cults
Members of the department
Normally offered in alternate years

REL 277 South Asian Masculinities
Members of the department


SDS 364 Research Seminar in Intergroup Relationships
Randi Garcia
Normally offered in alternate years

SOC 213 Race and National Identity in the United States
Vanessa Mohr Adel
Normally offered each academic year

SOC 216 Social Movements
Members of the department
Normally offered each academic year

SOC 229 Sex and Gender in American Society
William Cory Albertson
Normally offered each academic year

SOC 236 Beyond Borders: The New Global Political Economy
Payal Banerjee
Normally offered each academic year

SOC 237 Gender and Globalization
Payal Banerjee
Normally offered each academic year

SOC 239 How Power Works
Members of the department
Normally offered in alternate years

SOC 253 Sociology of Sexuality: Institutions, Identities and Cultures
William Cory Albertson
Normally offered each academic year

SOC 327 Seminar: Global Migration in the 21st Century
Payal Banerjee
Normally offered in alternate years

SOC 333 Seminar: Social Justice, the Environment and the Corporation
Members of the department
Normally offered in alternate years

SPN 230 Latin American and Peninsular Culture and Society

Maghribi Jewish Women: Cordoba, Casablanca, Tel Aviv

Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

SPN 250 Iberian Cultural History

Sex and the Medieval City

Members of the department


THE 221 Rehearsing the Impossible: Black Women Playwrights Interrupting the Master Narrative
Members of the department
Expected to be offered in the next 3 years

THE 319 Shamans, Shapeshifters and the Magic If
Andrea D. Hairston
Normally offered each fall

All majors offered at Smith (through departments and programs) have requirements and a curriculum that students must complete. However, it is also important to identify what a student will know or be able to do at the completion of the major.

Departments and programs have articulated the learning goals for their disciplines, and they are all listed on the Departmental Learning Goals page.

 


The information contained in the Courses of Study documents is accurate as of July. Smith College reserves the right to make changes to the Courses of Study, including changes in its course offerings, instructors, requirements for the majors and minors, and degree requirements. Course information contained herein is compiled by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty from data submitted by departments and programs. All data listed are as officially and formally approved by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty, the Committee on Academic Priorities, and the faculty-at-large. Additional information may be available on the individual Web sites of departments and programs.

Using the Catalog: Select a Tab to Start

General Information contains an overview of the college's history, the academic program, the campus and student body; information on admission, fees and financial aid; graduate programs; and a key for deciphering course listings.

Academic Programs includes information on all of the college's courses; majors, minors and concentrations; faculty directories; and requirements.

Course Search allows you to search a database of courses offered by Smith College. Information includes the course title, course description, department, subject, name of instructor(s), credits, meeting time, and curriculum distribution indication.

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Enter course number. The search selects all course numbers that include the entered course number. For example, entering course number 24 would select course number 246. Yearlong courses end in 'Y' or 'D'. To search for yearlong course enter just the number or the number followed by 'Y' or 'D'. This search is not case-sensitive. Partial course numbers can be entered.

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Course listings in this catalog indicate in curly brackets which area(s) of knowledge a given course covers. Please note that certain courses do not indicate any designation as decided by the department, program or instructor involved. Students who wish to become eligible for Latin Honors at graduation must elect at least one course (normally four credits) in each of the seven major fields of knowledge. (If a course is less than four credits but designated for Latin Honors, this will be indicated.)

The search will return courses with any one of the selected distributional groups. For example, if you select distributional groups Literature and Mathematics, you will select courses in Literature or courses in Mathematics or courses in Literature and Mathematics.

Writing Intensive available
Certain courses in Smith College place special emphasis on writing in one or more sections. These courses have the designation "Writing Intensive". Each first-year student is required, during her first or second semester at Smith, to complete at least one writing-intensive course.

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The Course Catalog Search Results displays the course section listing selected from the search criteria. Click on a course title for full information and description. Click on a department to view complete departmental listings.


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